Nov 26, 2018

Elon Musk is "not joking" about his belief that we're in a simulation

Screehshot: "Axios On HBO"

During an interview with "Axios on HBO" in which he discussed the “existential threat” of artificial intelligence, Tesla CEO Elon Musk said he's "not joking" about his belief that humanity might be living in a computer simulation.

The backdrop: Musk is among the most high-profile proponents of simulation theory, famously claiming in 2016 that there's a "one in billions" chance that we're not living in a simulation. He explains that video games today have become astronomically more realistic than they were 40 years ago, and that "if you assume any rate of improvement at all" — especially with the advent of virtual reality and augmented reality — games will eventually become indistinguishable from reality.

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Unemployment rate falls to 13.3% in May

Photo: Steve Jennings/Getty Images

The U.S. unemployment rate fell to 13.3% in May, with 2.5 million jobs gained, the government said on Friday.

Why it matters: The far better-than-expected numbers show improvements in a job market devastated by the coronavirus pandemic as economies reopen, the government said.

The difficulty of calculating the real unemployment rate

Data: U.S. Department of Labor; Note: Initial traditional state claims from the weeks of May 23 and 30, continuing traditional claims from May 23. Initial PUA claims from May 16, 23, and 30, continuing PUA and other programs from May 16; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

While economists predict that today's nonfarm payrolls report will show around 20 million Americans were unemployed in May, it's likely the real number is close to double that.

Why it matters: Traditional economic reports have failed to keep up with the devastation of the coronavirus pandemic and have made it nearly impossible for researchers to determine the state of the U.S. labor market or the economy.

1 hour ago - Sports

How coronavirus could reshuffle the sports calendar

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The NBA's Board of Governors approved Thursday the league's 22-team plan to resume play at Walt Disney World — a plan that also includes tentative dates for both this season and next.

Why it matters: The league's proposed trip to Disney World not only impacts this season but could have a domino effect that impacts seasons in the future — and could permanently change what time of year the NBA plays its games.