Photo: Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Elizabeth Warren announced a sweeping $800 billion public education plan on Monday, but it would exhaust the remainder of the $2.75 trillion that she says would be raised under her wealth tax proposal, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Why it matters: The announcement comes at a time when she's been criticized for dodging questions from her 2020 Democratic rivals on how she plans to pay for "Medicare for All."

  • The other major chunks of Warren's wealth tax would be used to fund tuition-free public college and abolish student debt ($1.25 trillion) and to create a universal child care program ($700 billion).
  • The education plan includes $450 billion in Title I funding to boost schools with low income students, $200 billion for student disability grants, another $100 billion in grants over 10 years and $50 billion for school infrastructure.

Worth noting: Warren has never directly tied the wealth tax to her Medicare for All plan, but she has been more reluctant to note on the trail and during debates that her health care plan may cause a tax increase for middle-income Americans — despite her progressive rival Bernie Sanders admitting that is a likely outcome.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 8 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Biden ahead in Wisconsin, Michigan as cases surge in the Midwest.
  2. Health: Surge "is real" and not just caused by more tests, Trump's testing czar saysMask mandates help control the rise in hospitalizations Some coronavirus survivors have "autoantibodies."
  3. Business: Surge is sinking consumer confidence Testing is a windfall.
  4. Media: Pandemic causes TV providers to lose the most subscribers ever.
  5. World: Putin mandates face masks.
20 mins ago - Podcasts

Pete Buttigieg talks Joe Biden's economic plans

Joe Biden has a very different prescription for America's economy than does President Trump. Not just in terms of how to tax and spend, but also in how to approach trading partners like China.

Axios Re:Cap digs into Biden's economic policies and philosophies with former presidential candidate and current Biden campaign surrogate Pete Buttigieg.

53 mins ago - Technology

Jack Dorsey: Twitter has no influence over elections

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey said Twitter does not have the ability to influence elections because there are ample additional sources of information, in response to questioning from Republican Sen. Ted Cruz during a hearing Wednesday.

Between the lines: The claim is sure to stir irritation on both the right and left. Conservatives argue Twitter and Facebook's moderation decisions help Democrats, while liberals contend the platforms shy from effectively cracking down on misinformation to appease Republicans.