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Eddie Gallagher. Photo: Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images

Navy SEAL platoon members painted a dark picture of Chief Petty Officer Eddie Gallagher, their leader who was acquitted of war crimes and had a minor charge cleared by President Trump, in leaked investigatory interview videos and text messages obtained by the New York Times.

Why it matters: The interviews, given by members of the platoon members that served under Gallagher, break the SEALs' unwritten code of silence and describe their leader as violent, "evil" and "toxic" — in contrast with Trump's portrayal of him as a hero.

What they're saying:

  • "The guy is freaking evil," Special Operator First Class Craig Miller told investigators.
  • "The guy was toxic," said Special Operator First Class Joshua Vriens, a sniper.
  • "You could tell he was perfectly okay with killing anybody that was moving," added Special Operator First Class Corey Scott, a medic in the platoon.

What happened: Three SEALs told Navy investigators that they saw Gallagher stab a sedated teenage ISIS fighter to death for no apparent reason, "and then hold an impromptu re-enlistment ceremony over the body, as if it were a trophy," per the Times.

  • One SEAL said Lt. Jacob Portier, a commander in the platoon, then told the others to gather around the corpse for a photo, leaving the platoon feeling like they had no choice but to do so.

The other side: Gallagher issued a statement to the Times via his lawyer, saying, "My first reaction to seeing the videos was surprise and disgust that they would make up blatant lies about me, but I quickly realized that they were scared that the truth would come out of how cowardly they acted on deployment."

  • "I felt sorry for them that they thought it necessary to smear my name, but they never realized what the consequences of their lies would be. As upset as I was, the videos also gave me confidence because I knew that their lies would never hold up under real questioning and the jury would see through it."
  • "Their lies and NCIS' refusal to ask hard questions or corroborate their stories strengthened my resolve to go to trial and clear my name."

Go deeper: Military officials say Trump's SEAL interventions embolden war criminals

Go deeper

Biden taps Brian Deese to lead National Economic Council

Brian Deese (L) in 2015 with special envoy for climate change Todd Stern (C) and Secretary of State John Kerry (R). Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden announced Thursday that he has selected Brian Deese, a former Obama climate aide and head of sustainable investing at BlackRock, to serve as director of the National Economic Council.

Why it matters: The influential position does not require Senate confirmation, but Deese's time working for BlackRock, the world's largest asset manager and an investor in fossil fuels, has made him a target of criticism from progressives.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
24 mins ago - Economy & Business

The places regulation does not reach

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Financial regulation is not exactly simple anywhere in the world. But one country stands out for the sheer amount of complexity and confusion in its regulatory regime — the U.S.

Why it matters: Important companies fall through the cracks, largely unregulated, while others contend with a vast array of regulatory bodies, none of which are remotely predictable.

1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Boeing gets huge 737 Max order from Ryanair, boosting hope for quick rebound

Ryanair low cost airline Boeing 737-800 aircraft as seen over the runway. Photo by Nik Oiko/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Dublin-based Ryanair said it would add 75 more planes to an existing order for Boeing's 737 Max airplanes, a giant vote of confidence as Boeing seeks to revive sales of its best-selling plane after a 20-month safety ban following two fatal crashes.

The big picture: Ryanair's big order, on the heels of breakthrough vaccine news, is also a promising sign that the devastated airline industry might recover from the global pandemic sooner than expected.