Stock market

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Asset managers say the 2020 election is now the market's top risk

The trade war dropped to the No. 2 concern among respondents for the first time since May.

Jan 22, 2020 - Economy & Business
How stocks shake off geopolitical tensions

Stocks have already recovered their losses from tensions with Iran.

Jan 9, 2020 - Economy & Business
Wall Street has its best year since 2013

The S&P 500 rose 29% in 2019 — despite trade war and economic uncertainty.

Dec 31, 2019 - Economy & Business
The stock of the decade: Netflix

Netflix is the S&P 500's best performer of the decade.

Dec 28, 2019 - Technology
The market will need the Fed again in 2020

The greatest risk to stocks is whether the Fed continues to stimulate the economy through what it calls "not QE."

Dec 4, 2019 - Economy & Business

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Warren Buffett releases annual letter, reassures investors about future of Berkshire Hathaway

Warren Buffett. Photo: Daniel Zuchnik/WireImage

Warren Buffett released his annual letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders on Saturday morning, sharing investment reflections and eyeing the future of the Omaha, Nebraska-based holding company and the market at large.

Details, via Axios' Courtenay Brown: Buffett turns 90 this year, though there’s no indication he plans to step aside, there is speculation about Buffett’s successor. Berkshire also notably exited the newspaper business last month.

Ex Glu Mobile CEO has a blank check company

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

While many tech companies are still apprehensive about going public and all the scrutiny that comes with that, ex-Glu Mobile CEO Niccolo de Masi just listed a special purpose acquisition corporation (SPAC) on the New York Stock Exchange, raising $200 million.

What’s next: De Masi, along with co-sponsor and former EMC executive Harry You, wants to create the next great mobile app-focused public company via this vehicle, he tells Axios. Think of it as Match Group, but for a different app category.

California's "woman quota" law seems to be working

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

When California passed its boardroom law requiring public companies based there to have at least one female director, there were concerns it would spark a gold rush for the same handful of well-known women — but that hasn’t happened.

Why it matters: Of the 138 women who joined all-male California boards last year, 62% are serving on their first company board, per a study by accounting firm KPMG. That means a majority of companies aren't contributing to so-called overboarding in corporate America.

Why the Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy

Victims' rights Attorney Jeff Anderson speaks to media during a press conference on April 23, 2019. Photo: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP via Getty Images

The Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy protection this week with the sole purpose of relieving the legal pressure it faces from sexual abuse victims.

Why it matters: Bankruptcy means that a judge will put a ceiling on how much BSA will pay to victims. The proceedings could limit the degree to which local councils' billions of dollars' worth of assets can be awarded to victims.

Trump indulges Wall Street with Milken pardon

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Chris Graythen/Getty Images

Donald Trump loves Wall Street shenanigans. Companies owned by him have declared bankruptcy six different times, and he was once sued alongside Mike Milken for participating in a scheme to artificially inflate junk-bond prices.

Driving the news: Trump pardoned Milken this week, with an official statement positively gushing over Milken's role in developing the wilder side of fixed-income capital markets.

Morgan Stanley to buy E*Trade in a $13 billion deal

Photo: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Morgan Stanley is buying E*Trade Financial, the company known for helping everyday Americans manage their money, in a $13 billion all-stock deal, the investment bank said Thursday.

Why it matters: The deal signals Morgan Stanley's desire to bulk up in wealth management, a strong profit arm of its business model. As the WSJ notes, Wall Street banks have been looking for steadier sources of revenue, now that "postcrisis regulations and a long period of eerie calm in the markets" have taken a toll on profits.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 20, 2020 - Economy & Business

Established VCs turn to "super angels" to grow their network

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Thanks to companies like AngelList and Carta that make it easier than ever to set up small VC funds, a new generation of so-called “super angels” is cropping up — and established venture funds are backing them.

Why it matters: Just like the boom in scout programs a number of years ago, it’s all about the deal flow.

WSJ: Leslie Wexner to step down as Victoria's Secret goes private

Photo: Keith Mayhew/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

L Brands is reportedly near a deal to sell a 55% stake in Victoria’s Secret to Sycamore Partners, which will take the women’s lingerie company private and value it at about $1.1 billion, per the Wall Street Journal.

Details: L Brands will keep the remaining stake in a separate company along with sister brand Pink, while the core company will now only operate Bath & Body Works. Leslie Wexner will step down as CEO and chairman but remain on the boards of both companies.

Gold rising with stocks, yen falling with bond yields

Data; FactSet; Chart: Axios Visuals

Markets are behaving strangely as investors attempt to make sense of the growing threat of the novel coronavirus. Assets that typically move in opposite directions are moving together, and assets that traditionally are very correlated are taking inverse tracks.

State of play: The market's two most popular safe-haven assets, gold and the Japanese yen, have decoupled and are moving in opposite directions.

More firms throw weight behind new Wall-Street backed stock exchange

Photo: Carl Court/Getty Images

Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan are joining the list of banks, brokerages and trading firms that back the Members Exchange, or "MEMX" — a new stock exchange that says it will go live in July and challenge incumbent exchanges by charging lower fees.

Why it matters: MEMX, which is still awaiting regulatory approval from the SEC, could be a formidable competitor to the entrenched "big three" stock exchanges.

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