A trader is reflected in a market screen on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Photo: Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Just this morning, President Trump touted recent economic successes under his administration: "The economy is looking really good. It has been many years that we have seen these kind of numbers. The underlying strength of companies has perhaps never been better."

Yes, but: Economists are ringing alarm bells that a recession may soon follow. Mark Zandi, Moody's Analytics' chief economist, told Bloomberg that 2020 is a "real inflection point." In the short-term, some economic forecasters believe the American economy will experience historically low unemployment and rising wages, but those developments could bring rising interest rates and decreased government spending in the years to come — eventually sparking an economic contraction.

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 12,294,117 — Total deaths: 555,531 — Total recoveries — 6,761,933Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 3,118,168 — Total deaths: 133,291 — Total recoveries: 969,111 — Total tested: 38,032,966Map.
  3. Public health: The U.S.' new default strategy: herd immunity.
  4. Business: The pandemic is driving a second jobs apocalypse.
  5. ✈️ Travel: Airlines say air quality, cleanliness lower risk.
  6. Sports: Sen. Richard Blumenthal calls on colleges to cancel fall sports.

Biden's big economic plan plays it down the middle for Democrats

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Joe Biden yesterday laid out the broad strokes of his economic policy platform, which seemingly is designed to not freak out centrists and not piss off progressives.

Why it matters: Biden has a better-than-even shot of becoming the next president, which means his tax plans could become everyone's tax bills.

Coronavirus surge punctures oil's recovery

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The growth of coronavirus cases is "casting a shadow" over oil's recovery despite the partial demand revival and supply cuts that have considerably tightened the market in recent months, the International Energy Agency said Friday.

Why it matters: IEA's monthly report confirms what analysts have seen coming for a long time: Failure to contain the virus is a huge threat to the market rebound that has seen prices grow, but remain at a perilous level for many companies.