Jun 24, 2019

Trump accuser: "Think how many women have come forward"

In an interview on CNN Monday, advice columnist E. Jean Carroll, who recently accused President Trump of sexually assaulting her in the 1990s, expressed frustration that Trump has not faced any consequences for the 16 total allegations of sexual misconduct brought against him.

"With all the 15 women or 16 who have come forward, it's the same. He denies it. He turns it around. He attacks. And he threatens. That is his — and then everybody forgets it and then the next woman comes along and I am sick of it. Alisyn, I am sick of it. Think how many women have come forward. Nothing happens. The only thing we can do is sit with you and tell our stories so that we empower other women to come forward and tell their stories because we have to change this culture of sexual violence."

Catch up quick: Carroll, a columnist for Elle, alleged that Trump pinned her against a wall in a New York dressing room in either 1995 or 1996, pulled down her tights, unzipped his pants and sexually assaulted her. Carrol claims she fought back and escaped relatively quickly. She told CNN that she is uncomfortable with the word "rape," but her description of the incident in her new book would legally qualify as rape.

  • Trump has responded saying the accusations are false and that he has never even met Carroll, though a photo published by The Cut shows the two at a party together in the 1990s. Trump also alleges that Carroll is using the anecdote to elevate book sales.

Carroll responded on CNN by saying "it was not about selling a book about Donald Trump," expressed frustration that "male authors never get this question." She also reacted to the infamous Access Hollywood tape in which Trump brags to co-host Billy Bush about sexual assault, telling CNN that she "felt relief" that her story could essentially be confirmed.

Go deeper: The lasting health effects of sexual assault

Go deeper

Zuckerberg says Trump’s “shooting” tweet didn’t violate Facebook’s rules

Mark Zuckerberg at the 56th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 15. Photo: Abdulhamid Hosbas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Facebook did not remove President Trump's threat to send the National Guard to Minneapolis because the company's policy on inciting violence allows discussion on state use of force, CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained in a post on Friday.

The big picture: Zuckerberg's statement comes on the heels of leaked internal criticism from Facebook employees over how the company handled Trump's posts about the Minneapolis protests and his unsubstantiated claims on mail-in ballots — both of which Twitter has now taken action on.

Updated 23 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 5,916,464— Total deaths: 364,357 — Total recoveries — 2,468,634Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 1,744,258 — Total deaths: 102,709 — Total recoveries: 406,446 — Total tested: 16,099,515Map.
  3. Public health: Hydroxychloroquine prescription fills exploded in March —How the U.S. might distribute a vaccine.
  4. 2020: North Carolina asks RNC if convention will honor Trump's wish for no masks or social distancing.
  5. Business: Fed chair Powell says coronavirus is "great increaser" of income inequality.
  6. 1 sports thing: NCAA outlines plan to get athletes back to campus.

Trump says he spoke with George Floyd's family

President Trump in the Rose Garden on May 29. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on Friday that he had spoken with the family of George Floyd, a black resident of Minneapolis who died after a police officer knelt on his neck on Monday.

Driving the news: Former Vice President Joe Biden said via livestream a few hours earlier that he, too, had spoken with Floyd's family. The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee implored white Americans to consider systemic injustices against African Americans more broadly, Axios' Alexi McCammond reports.