E. Jean Carroll in 2015 and President Trump. Photos: Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images for ELLE; Peter Summers/Getty Images

In a New York magazine cover story published Friday, author E. Jean Carroll accused President Trump of raping her in a dressing room of New York's Bergdorf Goodman department store in the mid-1990s.

Why it matters: Carroll's accusation is the 16th allegation of sexual misconduct or assault levied against the president throughout his time in public life — all of which he has denied.

  • Trump was caught on tape in 2005 during filming for an episode of "Access Hollywood" discussing groping and kissing women and saying that "when you’re a star, they let you do it." That tape was given to the Washington Post during the 2016 election.
  • The White House issued a statement on Friday evening in which Trump claimed he "never met this person in my life," despite the New York magazine article featuring a photo of Trump and Carroll together in 1987.

Between the lines: It's unusual to see a sexual assault allegation written in first person — the piece is an excerpt from Carroll's forthcoming book "What Do We Need Men For: A Modest Proposal?" — but Carroll says she disclosed the incident to two friends soon afterward, which New York magazine says it verified.

The big picture: The Trump account is only one portion of Carroll's piece, which includes her recounting other instances of alleged sexual assault at the hands of multiple men — including former CBS CEO and Chairman Les Moonves. She claims Moonves forced himself on her in a Beverly Hills hotel elevator after she interviewed him for a 1997 Esquire piece.

Go deeper: The lasting health effects of sexual assault

Go deeper

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Why it matters: America's two-sided response serves as an X-ray of the country itself — still capable of world-beating feats at the high end, but increasingly struggling with what should be the simple business of governing itself.

Joe Biden introduces Kamala Harris in first joint appearance

Joe Biden formally introduced Sen. Kamala Harris as his running mate on Wednesday, telling a socially-distanced gymnasium in Wilmington, Del.: "I have no doubt that I picked the right person to join me as the next vice president of the United States of America."

Why it matters: Harris is a historic pick for vice president, becoming the first Black woman and first South Asian woman to be named to a major-party U.S. presidential ticket. "Kamala knows how to govern," Biden said. "She knows how to make the hard calls. She is ready to do this job on day one."

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Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 20,439,274 — Total deaths: 744,941— Total recoveries: 12,632,604Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 5,180,226 — Total deaths: 165,510 — Total recoveries: 1,714,960 — Total tests: 63,252,257Map.
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  4. Business: U.S. already feeling effects of ending unemployment benefits.
  5. Public health: America is flying blind on its coronavirus response.
  6. Education: New Jersey governor allows schools to reopenGallup: America's confidence in public school system jumps to highest level since 2004.