Dec 5, 2019

Ethics Committee instructs Duncan Hunter to stop voting in the House

Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.) in Sept. 2018. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

The House Ethics Committee instructed Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.) to stop voting in the House on Thursday in light of his guilty plea to conspiracy to misuse campaign funds for his personal expenses.

The big picture: Hunter has not answered reporters' questions on whether he intends to resign from the House entirely, following his guilty plea on Tuesday. He insisted in 2018 that he would not resign after being forced to step down from all committee assignments, per the New York Times.

Read the letter.

Go deeper: Duncan Hunter says he'll plead guilty in corruption case

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Duncan Hunter to resign from Congress

Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.) on Dec. 3 in San Diego, California. Photo: Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images

Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.) announced his resignation from Congress on Friday, three days after pleading guilty to misusing campaign funds.

The state of play: Hunter's exit also comes a day after the House Ethics Committee instructed him to stop voting in light of his guilty plea. Hunter's plea agreement said he and his wife spent over $150,000 of campaign funds on personal expenses, including meals and luxury vacations, per CBS News.

Go deeperArrowDec 6, 2019

Duncan Hunter says he'll plead guilty in corruption case

Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.) told KUSI News on Monday that he will plead guilty on one count of misuse of campaign funds.

The big picture: Hunter's scheduled plea change — first hinted at in documents filed in federal court, per the San Diego Union-Tribune — comes six months after his wife changed her own plea. The couple was indicted in 2018 on allegations that they spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign funds for personal use, including on gas, groceries, lavish dinners and vacations.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Dec 2, 2019

House invites Trump to participate in impeachment hearings

President Trump. Photo: MANDEL NGAN / Contributor/Getty Images

President Trump has until Dec. 6 to decide whether his legal counsel will participate in House impeachment hearings, according to a letter sent by the House Judiciary Committee on Friday outlining next steps.

Why it matters: It remains unclear whether Trump or his legal team will take part in the probe looking into allegations that he abused his power in an attempt to convince Ukraine to launch investigations into the Russia probe and the Bidens. Trump said last week that he would consider testifying in the impeachment probe, but the White House has instructed multiple witnesses not to cooperate.

Go deeperArrowNov 30, 2019