Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Doug Sosnik, White House political director for President Clinton's re-election, shared with Axios his scenarios for America's November, including — in the spirit of the times — a "Doomsday Scenario" with three colliding crises:

  1. Political: "Delayed Results/Trump Refuses to Honor the Electoral Process during a Supreme Court Nomination Fight."
  2. Health: "The Country Suffers Phase 2 of the Coronavirus Pandemic."
  3. Economic: "Due to Political Instability and the Phase 2 Virus Outbreak, the Country Returns to an Economic Depression."

See the Sosnik scenarios.

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Go deeper

Oct 5, 2020 - Health

The coronavirus is in control

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The coronavirus is an unaware little pathogen hurtling aimlessly through the air. We are much smarter than the coronavirus and should be able to control it — and in many parts of the world, we have.

  • But not in America. Not even in the West Wing — the most secure part of America. Here, the virus is in control.

The cliffhanger could be ... Georgia

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1992, but Georgia's changing demographics may prove pivotal this year — not only to Trump v. Biden, but also to whether Democrats take control of the Senate.

Why it matters: If the fate of the Senate did hinge on Georgia, it might be January before we know the outcome. Meanwhile, voters' understanding of this power in the final days of the election could juice turnout enough to impact presidential results.

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Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.