Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump's plans to stoke conservative grievances about social media are part of a larger strategy to fan the us-vs.-them theme of his 2020 campaign. 

The big picture: The issue of tech companies being biased against conservatives is one of the hottest subjects among the Republican Party’s online base, per Axios' Jonathan Swan.

  • Outrage is fueled every time a new hidden video leaks showing employees at influential tech companies discussing their leftward political leanings.
  • Don Jr., the President’s eldest son, often tweets about tech bias.
  • Trump himself finally latched onto the issue in recent months, after being largely uninterested for the longest time.

What's happening: The "Presidential Social Media Summit," at the White House tomorrow, is so cozy that it's being called a "family conversation" internally — Facebook, Twitter and Google aren't invited.

  • The invitees are mostly conservative digital-media types, including consultants, activists and executives.
  • Trump will speak to the group, and is expected to discuss his own success on social media, along with some of his current complaintsabout bias and lack of competition.
  • Attendees have been invited to submit questions for the president and other speakers.

White House officials want the conservative "family" to push Silicon Valley to work on bias, transparency and fairness:

  • "Whenever conservatives talk about conservative bias," a White House official told Axios, "it’s perceived by the tech community as an attack. There’s an underlying denial that there's an issue at all."
  • But no formal findings or demands are planned.

Why it matters for politics ... Trump is all-in on scaling grievance: capitalists vs. socialists; Christians vs. non-Christians; rural vs. cities; conservatives vs. social media. 

  • Why it matters to tech: The giant companies are rightly worried that right-wing rallying cry of bias could escalate into new regulations or efforts to break up Google, Facebook or Amazon. 

Reality check from Axios' Scott Rosenberg and Ina Fried: Conservatives accurately view the workforces and culture at most large tech companies as lined up against them.

  • But most charges of anti-conservative bias in policy and content moderation haven't survived close examination.

Go deeper: White House summit spotlights right's new split on tech

Go deeper

Biden raises $141 million more than Trump

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a September campaign event in Wilmington, Delaware. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden's campaign, the Democratic National Committee and joint fundraising committees raised $466 million cash on hand, the presidential candidate's team announced late Sunday.

Why it matters: President Trump's campaign raised $325 million, his campaign communications director Tim Murtaugh announced Friday. In the spring, Biden was $187 million behind Trump and the Republican National Committee.

Driving the news: Slower spending by Biden's campaign and heavy spending by Trump's in the spring and record summer fund-raising hauls that spiked after he named Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) as his running mate contributed to the turnaround, notes the New York Times, which first reported the news.

Editor's note: This is a developing news story. Please check back for updates.

Virtual Emmys address chaotic year for American TV and society

Emmy Host Jimmy Kimmel during rehearsals Friday for the 72nd Annual Emmy Awards at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. Photo: Al Seib/ Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The Emmy Awards Sunday night addressed the major U.S. issues this year — including the protests on systemic racism and police brutality, the wildfires engulfing parts of the West Coast, the census, the pandemic, essential works and the election.

Why it matters: Award shows have always addressed wider cultural issues, but this year — amid unprecedented stress and uncertainty — that trend has accelerated.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 p.m. ET: 30,919,638 — Total deaths: 959,332— Total recoveries: 21,152,996Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30p.m. ET: 6,799,141 — Total deaths: 199,474 — Total recoveries: 2,590,671 — Total tests: 95,108,559Map.
  3. Politics: Testing czar on Trump's CDC contradictions: "Everybody is right" Ex-FDA chief: Career scientists won't be "easily cowed" by political vaccine pressure.
  4. Education: What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning.
  5. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19 — 7 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  6. World: England sets £10,000 fine for breaking self-isolation rules — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.