Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

An exuberant President Trump is considering attending the White House Correspondents' Association dinner, which he boycotted the last two years.

The state of play: Nothing has been decided yet, but we're hearing Trump hasn't said no to speaking at the April 27 dinner.

  • Yesterday's post-Mueller trip to Capitol Hill was being called a "victory lap" — and this could be his next stop.
  • But it also isn't clear how serious he is about going.
  • Historian Ron Chernow is the featured speaker. The association isn't having an entertainer this year.

It goes without saying: It could be awkward for both sides. After Attorney General Bill Barr's account of the Mueller report, Trump has amped up his attacks on the media, tweeting:

  • "The Mainstream Media is under fire and being scorned all over the World as being corrupt and FAKE. For two years they pushed the Russian Collusion Delusion when they always knew there was No Collusion. They truly are the Enemy of the People and the Real Opposition Party!"

Flashback: Michelle Wolf's vulgar anti-Trump jokes draw intense criticism

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The Justice Department and 11 states Tuesday filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing the company of using anticompetitive tactics to illegally monopolize the online search and search advertising markets.

Why it matters: The long-awaited suit is Washington's first major blow against the tech giants that many on both the right and left argue have grown too large and powerful. Still, this is just step one in what could be a lengthy and messy court battle.

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  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
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In photos: Florida breaks record for in-person early voting

Voters wait in line at John F. Kennedy Public Library in Hialeah, Florida on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Floridians cast early ballots for the 2020 election on Monday than in the first day of in-person early voting in 2016, shattering the previous record by over 50,000 votes, Politico reports.

The big picture: Voters have already cast over 31 million ballots in early voting states as of Tuesday, per the U.S. Elections Project database by Michael McDonald, an elections expert at the University of Florida.