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President Trump in a Tuesday morning tweet: "Nick Sandmann and the students of Covington have become symbols of Fake News and how evil it can be. They have captivated the attention of the world, and I know they will use it for the good - maybe even to bring people together. It started off unpleasant, but can end in a dream!"

Driving the news: Sandmann's face became famous on Saturday as he was videotaped wearing a "Make America Great Again" hat and smirking while standing in front of a Native American elder at the Lincoln Memorial.

  • Sandmann was in D.C. for the pro-life March for Life with a group from Covington Catholic High School, a private, all-male school in Kentucky.
  • The first video, which was spread by a now-suspended account purporting to be a California teacher, showed about 50 seconds from a longer scene.
  • Videos that later surfaced showed Black Hebrew Israelites, a religious group known for trollishly evangelizing in East Coast cities, jeering at the Native Americans as well as the Catholic boys, with remarks that were both racist and homophobic. (Warning: The following video contains inappropriate language.)

What they're saying:

  • Native American elder Nathan Phillips, the man Sandmann was videotaped standing in front of, said he moved in the direction of the boys to prevent any violence. Because he moved into the crowd, the boys largely surrounded him.
  • Sandmann said in a statement "that the students began yelling 'school spirit chants' to drown out the protesters and he did not hear students chant anything 'hateful or racist at any time.'"

Go deeper: Catholic boys' encounter gets second look

Editor's note: This article has been corrected to remove a reference that called Nathan Phillips a "Vietnam veteran." An earlier version of the story used the label, but the Washington Post noted Tuesday afternoon that Phillips, who was in the Marines from 1972-76, did not deploy to Vietnam.

Go deeper

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris sat down with CNN on Thursday for their first joint interview since the election.

The big picture: In the hour-long segment, the twosome laid out plans for responding to the pandemic, jump-starting the economy and managing the transition of power, among other priorities.

The quick FCC fix that would get more students online

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As the pandemic forces students out of school, broadband deployment programs aren't going to move fast enough to help families in immediate need of better internet access. But Democrats at the Federal Communications Commission say the incoming Biden administration could put a dent in that digital divide with one fast policy change.

State of play: An existing FCC program known as E-rate provides up to $4 billion for broadband at schools, but Republican FCC chairman Ajit Pai has resisted modifying the program during the pandemic to provide help connecting students at home.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

America's hidden depression

Biden introduces his pick for Treasury secretary, Janet Yellen, on Dec. 1. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President-elect Biden faces a fragile recovery that could easily fall apart, as the economy remains in worse shape than most people think.

Why it matters: There is a recovery happening. But it's helping some people immensely and others not at all. And it's that second part that poses a massive risk to the Biden-Harris administration's chance of success.