Jan 17, 2019

The Donald and Nancy show

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The cordial exchanges between President Trump and House Speaker Pelosi — from just weeks ago — appear to be over, as the two have moved to strip away privileges traditionally honored across party lines.

Driving the news: On Wednesday, Pelosi sent Trump a letter asking him to delay his State of the Union address until the government shutdown is resolved, citing security concerns. Today, Trump used the same reasoning to inform Pelosi that he will postpone her planned 7-day overseas trip to Brussels, Egypt and Afghanistan.

"Due to the shutdown, I am sorry to inform you that your trip to Brussels, Egypt and Afghanistan has been postponed. We will reschedule this seven-day excursion when the Shutdown is over. ... Obviously, if you would like to make your journey by flying commercial, that would certainly be your prerogative."

Between the lines: As CBS' Steven Portnoy notes, aides had asked news organizations not to publicly report the details of Pelosi's trip due to national security concerns. She was scheduled to depart at 3 p.m., just 30 minutes after the letter was released, Fox News' John Roberts reports.

What they're saying:

  • Pelosi deputy chief of staff Drew Hammill: "The CODEL [congressional delegation] to Afghanistan included a required stop in Brussels for pilot rest. In Brussels, the delegation was scheduled to meet with top NATO commanders, U.S. military leaders and key allies—to affirm the United States’ ironclad commitment to the NATO alliance. This weekend visit to Afghanistan did not include a stop in Egypt. The purpose of the trip was to express appreciation and thanks to our men and women in uniform for their service and dedication, and to obtain critical national security & intelligence briefings from those on the front lines. The President traveled to Iraq during the Trump Shutdown as did a Republican CODEL led by Rep. Zeldin."
  • Sen. Lindsey Graham: "One sophomoric response does not deserve another. Speaker Pelosi’s threat to cancel the State of the Union is very irresponsible and blatantly political. President Trump denying Speaker Pelosi military travel to visit our troops in Afghanistan, our allies in Egypt and NATO is also inappropriate."
  • Rep. Adam Schiff: "The president’s decision to disclose a trip that the speaker was traveling to a war zone is completely and utterly irresponsible. ... All too often in the last two years, the president has acted like he’s in fifth grade."

The bottom line: With 800,000 workers missing paychecks and government services on life support, the shutdown looks far more like a political campaign than a negotiation.

Go deeper

Trump says he will campaign against Lisa Murkowski after her support for Mattis

Trump with Barr and Meadows outside St. John's Episcopal church in Washington, D.C. on June 1. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Thursday that he would endorse "any candidate" with a pulse who runs against Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

Driving the news: Murkowski said on Thursday that she supported former defense secretary James Mattis' condemnation of Trump over his response to protests in the wake of George Floyd's killing. She described Mattis' statement as "true, honest, necessary and overdue," Politico's Andrew Desiderio reports.

8 hours ago - World

The president vs. the Pentagon

Trump visits Mattis and the Pentagon in 2018. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty

Over the course of just a few hours, President Trump was rebuffed by the Secretary of Defense over his call for troops in the streets and accused by James Mattis, his former Pentagon chief, of trampling the Constitution for political gain.

Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.

New York Times says Tom Cotton op-ed did not meet standards

Photo: Avalon/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

A New York Times spokesperson said in a statement Thursday that the paper will be changing its editorial board processes after a Wednesday op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), which called for President Trump to "send in the troops" in order to quell violent protests, failed to meet its standards.

Why it matters: The shift comes after Times employees began a coordinated movement on social media on Wednesday and Thursday that argued that publishing the op-ed put black staff in danger. Cotton wrote that Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act in order to deploy the U.S. military against rioters that have overwhelmed police forces in cities across the country.