Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Jay Sekulow, a private lawyer for President Trump, tells me that the White House doesn't plan a "war room"-like structure of legal and communications rapid response like President Bill Clinton deployed during the last impeachment fight.

Invoking the Mueller investigation, Sekulow said: "We have just handled a major investigation that was multifaceted and multi-jurisdictional. There was no war room. We responded as appropriate. We won that battle."

Sekulow said the impeachment inquiry "will be handled the same way."

  • "Solid teams are in place both inside the White House and outside," the lawyer said. "I am confident that we will meet any issues with Congress."
  • Trump, like during the Russia probe, will often serve as the commander, the spokesman, and the combatant.
  • You saw this last night when he decided to quote a pastor claiming America could fall into a civil war if he is ousted. 

Lanny Davis, the face of Clinton's war room during the impeachment battle of 1998-99, said Trump's team is making a mistake by not distinguishing between the Mueller investigation and impeachment.

  • Davis said the Clinton war room included about a dozen people, half of them lawyers.
  • "Without facts, good or bad," Davis told me, "you can't effectively defend against impeachment."

Go deeper: Pelosi's point of no return

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Updated 26 mins ago - World

At least 100 killed, much of Beirut destroyed in massive explosion

Photo: Anwar Amro/AFP via Getty Images

A major explosion Beirut, Lebanon has killed at least 100 people and injured over 4,000, according to the Lebanese Red Cross.

Driving the news: Prime Minister Hassan Diab said the explosions occurred at a warehouse that had been storing 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate for over six years.

Biden confidants see VP choices narrowing to Harris and Rice

Photos: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; Win McNamee/Getty Images

Confidants of Joe Biden believe his choices for vice president have narrowed to Sen. Kamala Harris and Susan Rice — and would be surprised if he picks anyone else.

The state of play: This is a snapshot of the nearly unanimous read that we get from more than a dozen people close to him.

An election like no other

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The coronavirus will make the 2020 presidential election different from any in modern history: Voting that begins earlier, results that take longer, mail carriers as virtual poll workers and October Surprises that pop in September.

The big picture: Perhaps 80 million Americans will vote early, by mail or in person, Tom Bonier, CEO of TargetSmart, a Democratic political data firm, tells Axios. That's going to set up more of an Election Season than an Election Day — and increase the odds of national turmoil over the vote count.