Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

News companies are taking advantage of the interest surrounding the impeachment saga by building pop-up newsletters, podcasts and sections solely to cover the day-to-day developments of the impeachment process.

The bottom line: If there's an appetite for more coverage, news companies these days can build products pretty quickly to satisfy it.

  • Podcasts: Vox Media launched a new weekly "Impeachment, Explained" podcast last week hosted by Ezra Klein. WNYC also launched an "Impeachment with Brian Lehrer" podcast earlier this month.
  • Newsletters: CNN launched an impeachment tracker newsletter that amassed over 11,000 subscribers in a few days, per CNN. The New York Times also launched an impeachment briefing newsletter.
  • Alerts: CNN's digital app impeachment-related app alerts attracted 300,000 subscribers in just a week, a spokesperson said.

The big picture: We've seen this strategy play out with other special news cycles.

  • Game of Thrones: The New York Times, The Telegraph, and even Politico all developed Game of Thrones newsletters that guided readers through the end of the series. About 80,000 subscribed to the Times' eight-edition newsletter, per Digiday.
  • World Cup: The Times and The Washington Post both ran pop-up newsletters around the World Cup.
  • Midterms: Vox, Stat News and others launched pop-up newsletters for the 2018 midterm elections.

Go deeper: Conservative news goes to war over impeachment

Go deeper

Postal workers' union endorses Biden

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The National Association of Letter Carriers, the union representing roughly 300,000 current and former postal workers, on Friday endorsed Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election, calling him "a fierce ally and defender of the U.S. Postal Service," reports NBC News.

Why it matters: The endorsement comes as President Trump has vowed to block additional funding for the USPS in the next coronavirus stimulus package, linking it to his continued baseless claims that increased mail-in voting will lead to widespread voter fraud.

Lawmakers demand answers from World Bank on Xinjiang loan

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

U.S. lawmakers are demanding answers from the World Bank about its continued operation of a $50 million loan program in Xinjiang, following Axios reporting on the loans.

Why it matters: The Chinese government is currently waging a campaign of cultural and demographic genocide against ethnic minorities in Xinjiang, in northwest China. The lawmakers contend that the recipients of the loans may be complicit in that repression.

Obama: Americans could be "collateral damage" in Trump's war on mail-in voting

Photo: Zahim Mohd/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Former President Barack Obama tweeted Friday that everyday Americans could become "collateral damage" if President Trump continues to attempt to slash funding for the U.S. Postal Service as part of his campaign against mail-in voting.

Why it matters: Trump linked his baseless claims that increased mail-in voting will lead to widespread voter fraud on Thursday to the current impasse in coronavirus stimulus negotiations.