Nov 19, 2019

Pro-Trump group finds swing voters are unconvinced on impeachment

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

The pro-Trump group America First says focus groups show that suburban swing voters — even some who strongly dislike President Trump — remain skeptical about impeachment.

Why it matters: These early findings will help shape Republican messaging about impeachment and Trump's top Democratic rivals.

The big takeaway from impeachment so far is that swing voters think Trump did things they don't like — but nothing impeachable, said Wes Anderson, co-founder of OnMessage Inc. and one of the pollsters who conducted the focus groups.

  • Anderson said these voters "don’t have any shortage of criticisms of the president, [on] personality and stylistically. But they’re pretty happy with two or three or four specific things he's done," such as the border or China trade.
  • Organizers held two focus groups each in these metro areas: Des Moines, Orlando, Charlotte, Phoenix, Miami, Atlanta, Columbus, Detroit and Pittsburgh.
  • While a focus group is not a statistically significant sample like a poll, these responses can show how some voters are thinking and talking about the 2020 election.

The bottom line: The findings bolster Republicans' strategy of asking voters to assess Trump on the effectiveness of his policies, not on his governing style.

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Campaigns target younger voters online

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Driving the news: Over a 90-minute PowerPoint session at a hotel in Arlington, Va., on Thursday, Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner, campaign manager Brad Parscale and other senior Trump campaign officials presented dozens of national political reporters their theory of how Trump can win again in 2020.

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