Feb 7, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Federal appeals court dismisses Democrats' emoluments suit against Trump

Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

A federal appeals court dismissed Friday a lawsuit from 215 congressional Democrats against President Trump alleging that the Trump Organization is in breach of the Constitution's emoluments clause.

The big picture: It's just one of several emoluments-linked cases facing Trump while in office, including others filed by the attorneys general of Maryland and D.C. and the federal ethics watchdog CREW.

  • The ruling asserted that individual members of Congress lacked the standing to assert the powers of the institution as a whole.
  • Democrats had hoped the case could carve a path to access Trump's finances.

Read the opinion:

Go deeper: Trump made at least $434 million from his business in 2018

Go deeper

State attorneys general sue to demand certification of Equal Rights Amendment

Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Three Democratic state attorneys general filed a lawsuit against a federal government official on Thursday to certify the Equal Rights Amendment, which would ban sex-based discrimination, into the U.S. Constitution.

The big picture: The lawsuit follows the National Archives and Records Administration's decision not to adopt the amendment, despite Virginia's General Assembly approving the ERA in mid-January, becoming the 38th state to do so. The NARA's decision is in line with a Justice Department legal opinion also issued earlier this month, arguing that Congress imposed a deadline for ratification, which expired in 1982.

Go deeperArrowJan 30, 2020

Senate acquits Trump

Trump at a White House meeting in December. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Senate has acquitted President Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

The big picture: This is the ending that was expected all along, but the way the Senate trial ended — with nearly every Republican declining to pursue new information about Trump's Ukraine activities — has raised alarms about the growth of presidential power and the refusal of Congress to stop it.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 5, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Appeals court rules against Trump's Medicaid work requirements

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Trump administration violated federal law by allowing red states to impose work requirements on their Medicaid programs, a federal appeals court ruled Friday. The court said the administration had not properly justified its decision, and that it was out of step with Medicaid's statutory goals.

What's next: The most likely next step is an appeal to the Supreme Court. In the meantime, the administration has not won a single favorable ruling in lawsuits over what had once looked like one of its most significant health care policies.