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A security contractor frisks a female immigration detainee in Arizona ahead of a deportation flight. Photo: John Moore / Getty Images

The Justice Department will be implementing a new quota system to federal immigration judges' performance reviews, reports the WSJ, under which judges will be expected to clear 700 cases to receive a "satisfactory" rating.

Why it matters: The new quotas, detailed in a memo sent to immigration judges on Friday, are part of a wider effort to speed up deportation decisions and reduce a hefty backlog of more than 600,000 cases that are pending before the Executive Office of Immigration Review (EOIR).

What's next: The quotas will go into effect in the next fiscal year, beginning October 1, according to WSJ.

By the numbers, per WSJ:

  • Under the new standard judges must complete 700 cases per year, and have fewer than 15% of their decisions sent back by a higher court.
  • Over the past five years, the average judge completed 678 cases in a year, Justice Department spokesman Devin O’Malley told WSJ. But he added that some judges cleared as many as 1,500 cases in one year.
  • Other standards, which vary by each judge's workload, may include completing 85% of removal cases for detainees within three days of a hearing on the merits of the case. Another demands that 95% of all merits hearings be completed on the initial scheduled hearing date.

What they're saying:

  • "This is the equivalent of completing three cases a day," O’Malley told Axios, suggesting that the new standards won't be t0o difficult to meet.
  • “This is a recipe for disaster,” A. Ashley Tabaddor, an immigration judge in Los Angeles and president of the National Association of Immigration Judges told WSJ. “You are going to, at minimum, impact the perception of the integrity of the court.”

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
46 mins ago - Economy & Business

America on borrowed time

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Economic recovery will not be linear as the world continues to grapple with the uncertainty of the pandemic.

Why it matters: Despite being propped up by an extraordinary amount of fiscal stimulus and support from central banks, the state of the global economy remains fragile.

Scoop: Gina Haspel threatened to resign over plan to install Kash Patel as CIA deputy

CIA Director Gina Haspel. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

CIA Director Gina Haspel threatened to resign in early December after President Trump cooked up a hasty plan to install loyalist Kash Patel, a former aide to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), as her deputy, according to three senior administration officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

Why it matters: The revelation stunned national security officials and almost blew up the leadership of the world's most powerful spy agency. Only a series of coincidences — and last minute interventions from Vice President Mike Pence and White House counsel Pat Cipollone — stopped it.

Updated 13 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.