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Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Democratic National Committee on Monday released the qualification criteria for the 5th round of presidential primary debates in November.

The big picture: The required thresholds for both polling and individual donations have again been raised from previous debates in an effort to whittle down the field.

  • A candidate must reach 3% in at least 4 accepted polls or reach 5% in 2 single-state polls in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and/or Nevada in order to qualify.
  • A candidate must also reach 165,000 unique donors and a minimum of 600 unique donors per state in at least 20 U.S. states.

What they're saying: Some lower-tier campaigns tell Axios they're hopeful about the new thresholds, since 3% in polling seems relatively attainable. Other top-tier candidates consider 3% too low in a field that's still fairly crowded, especially with the Iowa caucuses just 4 months away from the November debates.

  • Some have characterized the thresholds as an overcorrection from the DNC's approach in 2016 — an attempt to be inclusive of all candidates and not just the establishment favorites.

Go deeper: The 2020 candidates who have qualified for the next Democratic debate

Go deeper

1 hour ago - World

Special report: Trump's U.S.-China transformation

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump began his term by launching the trade war with China he had promised on the campaign trail. By mid-2020, however, Trump was no longer the public face of China policy-making as he became increasingly consumed with domestic troubles, giving his top aides carte blanche to pursue a cascade of tough-on-China policies.

Why it matters: Trump alone did not reshape the China relationship. But his trade war shattered global norms, paving the way for administration officials to pursue policies that just a few years earlier would have been unthinkable.

McConnell: Trump "provoked" Capitol mob

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said on Tuesday that the pro-Trump mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 was "provoked by the president and other powerful people."

Why it matters: Trump was impeached by the House last week for "incitement of insurrection." McConnell has not said how he will vote in Trump's coming Senate impeachment trial, but sources told Axios' Mike Allen that the chances of him voting to convict are higher than 50%.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

GOP leaders skip Trump sendoff in favor of church with Biden

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) in July. Photo by Erin Scott-Pool/Getty Images

Congressional leaders, including House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, will skip President Trump's departure ceremony in Maryland tomorrow morning in favor of attending mass with incoming President Joe Biden ahead of his inauguration, congressional sources familiar with their plans tell Axios.

Why it matters: Their decision is a clear sign of unity before Biden takes the oath of office.