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We tend to think of a single "digital divide" separating the haves and have-nots in the online world, but inequality in the internet era takes on a vast number of forms.

Data: SurveyMonkey online poll conducted Nov. 27–29 among 3,308 U.S. adults. Total margin of error is ±2.5 percentage points; Poll methodology; Chart: Chris Canipe/Axios

Economics and geography play the biggest role, with those in cities enjoying far greater connectivity than those in rural areas. Similarly, people with more wealth tend to have more and faster connections. While those are the two biggest factors, there are also differences across race, education and age.

The bottom line: Not all online access is equal. People in rural areas often have significantly fewer and slower options than their city-dwelling counterparts.

  • And while many low-income households in cities have some broadband access, it's far more likely to be limited to a cellphone, which is less versatile for doing homework and applying for jobs.

The big picture: Over the weekend, Axios took a deep dive into the many digital divides in America, looking at the debate over how much access kids should have to cellphones, iOS vs. Android, the impact of 5G and other issues.There's lots to dig into, but here are a couple of points that stand out to me...

  1. For all the talk about Silicon Valley executives keeping their kids away from smartphones, most of the country sees early access to technology as a key means of gaining the skills needed for the jobs of the future.
  2. Speaking of smartphones, those at the high end of the economic ladder have their choice of iPhone or Android, while those who can't afford several hundred dollars for their phone are likely to have only Android options. That means they are likely to see more ads and have less built-in privacy protection.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

North Carolina officials: Pandemic underscores the need for broadened internet connectivity

Photo: Axios

The coronavirus pandemic has emphasized the need for connecting underserved communities to the digital world, Thomas Parrish, the acting chief information officer of North Carolina's Information Technology Department, said on Tuesday at an Axios virtual event on the Future of Employability.

Why it matters: Countries around the world have been investing in connectivity, Parrish said, and the U.S. is now starting to realize that broadening internet access is "now something we can no longer afford to miss."

Top economic regulators stressed by vacancies

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

The boom times are all around us (from corporate deal sprees to the breakneck rise of cryptocurrency) — and the agencies in charge are stretched thin trying to police it.

Why it matters: Overwhelmed staff and a slew of vacant posts could set back President Biden's big regulatory agenda.

GOP Sen. Chuck Grassley announces run for re-election

Photo: Greg Nash/The Hill/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), the longest-serving Senate Republican, announced on Friday that he's running for re-election in 2022.

Why it matters: The GOP is looking to regain control of both chambers of Congress in the upcoming midterm elections. Several Republicans had urged the 88-year-old senator to run to avoid another retirement after five incumbent senators said they wouldn't seek re-election.

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