Aug 3, 2018

Why it matters: Rep. Diane Black lost her primary for Tennessee governor

Rep. Diane Black. Photo: Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Republican Rep. Diane Black gave up her seat in Congress to run for governor and she got crushed by an underdog candidate.

Why it matters: It's getting harder to be an ambitious House Republican these days. So far in 2018, Black is the fifth House GOP member to run for statewide office and lose.

The last time every single Republican House member who ran for other offices (Senate or governor) won their primary was in 2000. All six became the nominee in their races, but all six ended up losing the general election to a Democrat.

President Trump's endorsement is worth its weight in gold for Republican candidates in 2018. The only problem for Black is that she didn't get it. Instead, she was endorsed by Vice President Mike Pence and ran ads that featured clips of Trump praising her.

  • Four of the six who have won had Trump's blessing via endorsement — Lou Barletta in Pennsylvania, Jim Renacci in Ohio, Kevin Cramer in North Dakota and Marsha Blackburn in Tennessee.
  • Six of the 12 incumbents running for higher office or for re-election have won their primary.
  • The other incumbents to lose their bids are Evan Jenkins in West Virginia, Raul Labrador in Idaho, Todd Rokita in Indiana, and Luke Messer in Indiana.

One more thing: It may be the year of the woman in 2018, but that doesn't always extend to Republican incumbents running for higher office. Now — as Cook Political Report's Dave Wasserman points out — the nominees for Black's congressional seat in Tennessee's 6th district and Rep. Blackburn's seat in the 7th district will be men.

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World coronavirus updates: London mayor says U.K. a week away from worst of virus

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern offered hope in the fight against the novel coronavirus, saying she believes New Zealand has "turned a corner" after two weeks of strict lockdown measures. But London Mayor Sadiq Khan has said the U.K. is "nowhere near" lifting restrictions.

The big picture: COVID-19 has killed over 82,000 people and infected 1.4 million others globally as of early Wednesday, per Johns Hopkins data. Global recoveries have surpassed 301,000. Spain has reported the most cases outside the U.S. (more than 141,000) and Italy the most deaths (over 17,000). Half the planet's population is on lockdown.

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Wisconsin may be the start of the 2020 election wars

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Wisconsin voters braving lines in face masks — after a last-minute Supreme Court ruling against extending the absentee deadline — could foreshadow a nationwide legal struggle over how to conduct elections during the coronavirus outbreak, election experts say.

Why it matters: "It's a harbinger of what's to come in the next skirmishes in the voting wars" from now through November, Richard Hasen, a professor and national election law expert at the University of California, Irvine, told Axios.

New Zealand sets sights on coronavirus elimination after 2 weeks of lockdown

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern gives a coronavirus media update at the New Zealand Parliament in Wellington. Photo: Mark Mitchell - Pool/Getty Images

AUCKLAND -- New Zealand has flattened the curve of novel coronavirus cases after two weeks of lockdown and the next phase is to "squash it," Professor Shaun Hendy, who heads a scientific body advising the government on COVID-19, told Axios.

Why it matters: The country imposed 14 days ago some of the toughest restrictions in the world in response to the pandemic, despite confirming only 102 cases and no deaths at the time.

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