Nov 26, 2019

DHL to introduce zero-emission electric delivery vans in U.S. in 2020

The DHL StreetScooter in Bonn, Germany in May. Photo: Rolf Vennenbernd/picture alliance via Getty Images

Global shipper DHL will begin rolling out its zero-emission StreetScooter electric vehicle fleet in the U.S. next spring, as the firm works to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, Reuters reported Monday.

Why it matters: Per the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the transportation industry contributed to 14% of global greenhouse gas emissions in 2010 — and many delivery companies are working to get cleaner and greener by using electric vehicles.

The big picture: UPS has 1,000 electric and hybrid electric vehicles and FedEx committed last year to adding 1,000 electric delivery vans to its fleet in California —which launched with automakers in 2018 a multi-million-dollar campaign aimed at speeding up adoption of EVs in the state.

  • Amazon announced in September it would deploy 10,000 electric delivery vans made by the startup Rivian as soon as 2022, and 100,000 by 2030 or sooner.
  • "Amazon said its delivery partners are using around 200 electric vehicles," Reuters notes.
  • In Europe, DHL has spent the past three years introducing its "CO2-free last mile delivery" initiative, with about 10,000 of the 12,000 StreetScooters delivering for DHL and "saving roughly 36,000 metric tons of CO2 per truck each year," per Reuters.

What's next: The EV deployment in the U.S. should be completed by 2022 or 2023, Ulrich Stuhec, StreetScooter's chief technology officer, told Reuters.

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Zuckerberg says Trump’s “shooting” tweet didn’t violate Facebook’s rules

Mark Zuckerberg at the 56th Munich Security Conference in Munich, Germany on February 15. Photo: Abdulhamid Hosbas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Facebook did not remove President Trump's threat to send the National Guard to Minneapolis because the company's policy on inciting violence allows discussion on state use of force, CEO Mark Zuckerberg explained in a post on Friday.

The big picture: Zuckerberg's statement comes on the heels of leaked internal criticism from Facebook employees over how the company handled Trump's posts about the Minneapolis protests and his unsubstantiated claims on mail-in ballots — both of which Twitter has now taken action on.

Updated 37 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 5,916,464— Total deaths: 364,357 — Total recoveries — 2,468,634Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 1,744,258 — Total deaths: 102,709 — Total recoveries: 406,446 — Total tested: 16,099,515Map.
  3. Public health: Hydroxychloroquine prescription fills exploded in March —How the U.S. might distribute a vaccine.
  4. 2020: North Carolina asks RNC if convention will honor Trump's wish for no masks or social distancing.
  5. Business: Fed chair Powell says coronavirus is "great increaser" of income inequality.
  6. 1 sports thing: NCAA outlines plan to get athletes back to campus.

Trump says he spoke with George Floyd's family

President Trump in the Rose Garden on May 29. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on Friday that he had spoken with the family of George Floyd, a black resident of Minneapolis who died after a police officer knelt on his neck on Monday.

Driving the news: Former Vice President Joe Biden said via livestream a few hours earlier that he, too, had spoken with Floyd's family. The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee implored white Americans to consider systemic injustices against African Americans more broadly, Axios' Alexi McCammond reports.