Jan 31, 2018

Nunes: "It's no surprise" FBI and DOJ don't want to release the memo

Rep. Devin Nunes. Photo: Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call

House Intelligence Committee Chair Devin Nunes, who wrote the controversial memo detailing alleged FISA abuses, has responded to the FBI's statement urging the White House not to release the classified document:

[I]t’s no surprise to see the FBI and DOJ issue spurious objections to allowing the American people to see information related to surveillance abuses at these agencies.
— Devin Nunes

Timing: Earlier today the FBI said they have "grave concerns" about the memo and its accuracy. Meanwhile, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said the release of the memo will come "pretty quick."

Go deeper: The big questions surrounding the Nunes memo

Full statement from Nunes:

"Having stonewalled Congress’ demands for information for nearly a year, it’s no surprise to see the FBI and DOJ issue spurious objections to allowing the American people to see information related to surveillance abuses at these agencies.
The FBI is intimately familiar with ‘material omissions’ with respect to their presentation to both Congress and the courts, and they are welcome to make public, to the greatest extent possible, all the information they have on these abuses.
Regardless, it’s clear that top officials used unverified information in a court document to fuel a counter-intelligence investigation during an American political campaign. Once the truth gets out, we can begin taking steps to ensure our intelligence agencies and courts are never misused like this again.”

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