Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick. Photo: Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Editor's Note: Patrick dropped out of the race on February 12th, 2020. Below is our original article on his candidacy.

Democrat Deval Patrick is a businessman and was the first black governor of Massachusetts. He has close personal ties to former President Obama and some of his closest advisers.

Key facts
  • Current position: n/a
  • Age: 63
  • Born: Chicago, Ill.
  • Education: Harvard University (BA, JD)
  • Date candidacy announced: Nov. 14, 2019
  • Previous roles: Managing director at Bain Capital (2015-2019); Governor of Massachusetts (2007-2015), board of directors of ACC Capital Holdings (2004-2006), executive vice president at Coca-Cola (2001-2004), general counsel at Texaco (1999-2001), U.S. Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division (1994-1997)
Stance on key issues
  • Medicare for All: Called it a "terrific idea" last year, but only "alongside various of the private options that are available" under the Affordable Care Act.
    • Signed legislation in Massachusetts linking cost increases in health care to the rate of growth of the state’s economy.
  • Climate change: Has offered a proposal that aims at "a 100% carbon neutral-economy no later than 2040" by establishing a standard for clean energy and construction.
  • Immigration: As governor, allowed undocumented immigrants in Massachusetts to qualify for in-state tuition.
  • Gun control: Said after the Newtown shooting that he supports a renewal of the national ban on assault weapons.
  • Education: Proposed doubling the number of charter schools in Massachusetts and imposing universal pre-K.
    • Proposed making community college free in the state.
  • Abortion: Signed a law allowing police to order anti-abortion protesters to be removed from entrances to clinics if they were blocking access to the building.
  • Opioid crisis: Signed into law a requirement for insurers to provide up to 14 days of inpatient care for people with addictions.
  • Taxes: Supports raising corporate tax rate to 25%.
  • Reparations: Supports a plan for government-provided reparations to living descendants of slaves and supports a House bill calling for a commission to study the issue.
Key criticisms
  • He entered the Democratic presidential field less than three months from the Iowa caucuses, missing the filing deadlines in Alabama and Arkansas.
  • He has ties large corporations throughout his legal and business careers, which more progressive Democratic candidates have criticized during this election cycle.
1 fun thing
  • A portion of a street in Patrick's Chicago hometown was renamed for him in 2013.

Go deeper: Everything you need to know about the other 2020 candidates

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
8 mins ago - Economy & Business

First glimpse of the Biden market

Photo: Jonathan Ernst-Pool/Getty Images

Investors made clear what companies they think will be winners and which will be losers in President Joe Biden's economy on Wednesday, selling out of gun makers, pot purveyors, private prison operators and payday lenders, and buying up gambling, gaming, beer stocks and Big Tech.

What happened: Private prison operator CoreCivic and private prison REIT Geo fell by 7.8% and 4.1%, respectively, while marijuana ETF MJ dropped 2% and payday lenders World Acceptance and EZCorp each fell by more than 1%.

Mike Allen, author of AM
40 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden-Harris, Day 1: What mattered most

President Joe Biden and first lady Dr. Jill Biden arrive at the North Portico of the White House. Photo: Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

The Axios experts help you sort significance from symbolism. Here are the six Day 1 actions by President Biden that matter most.

Driving the news: Today, on his first full day, Biden translates his promise of a stronger federal response to the pandemic into action — starting with 10 executive orders and other directives, Caitlin Owens writes.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Read: Pete Buttigieg's opening statement ahead of confirmation hearing

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to be secretary of transportation, in December. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/AFP via Getty Images

Pete Buttigieg, President Biden's nominee to lead the Transportation Department, will tell senators he plans to prioritize the health and safety of public transportation systems during the pandemic — and look to infrastructure projects to rebuild the economy — according to a copy of his prepared remarks obtained by Axios.

Driving the news: Buttigieg will testify at 10 a.m. ET before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation. He is expected to face a relatively smooth confirmation process, though GOP lawmakers may press him on "green" elements of Biden's transportation proposals.