Jan 15, 2019

New DOJ opinion expands Wire Act outside of sports betting

Bet365 on a smartphone. Photo: Miguel Candela/SOPA Images via Getty Images

The Department of Justice announced the reversal of a 2011 opinion on the Wire Act on Monday, making the law applicable to all forms of gambling that cross state boundaries.

Why it matters: Online gaming and gambling has re-entered the mainstream since the Supreme Court's 2018 decision legalizing sports betting in the United States. The opinion could affect states such as Nevada, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware where online gambling is legal.

Be smart: The Wire Act is a law banning bettors from transmitting gambling data across states through the use of wire services such as telecommunications devices. The law has hardly been enforced federally because it's too unclear.

  • The act was originally created to prevent mob members from betting on rigged sporting events from state to state. It was also created at a time when the Internet didn't exist.
  • This expansion of the Wire Act won't matter if the language in the bill is too unclear.

Read the opinion:

Go deeper

10 mins ago - Technology

Cisco, Sony postpone events amid continued protests

Screenshot: Axios (via YouTube)

Cisco said Monday night that it is postponing the online version of Cisco Live, its major customer event, amid the ongoing protests that have followed the killing of George Floyd.

Why it matters: Cisco joins Sony, Electronic Arts and Google in delaying tech events planned for this week.

16 mins ago - Technology

Twitter suspends fake antifa account tied to white nationalists

Twitter said Monday that it has suspended an account named "ANTIFA_US" which it says was tied to the white nationalist group Identity Evropa. Over the weekend, the account had called for violence and its posts had widely circulated online.

Why it matters: It's the latest example of social media being used to exploit and sharpen the very real divisions in American society. It's also the latest example of Twitter more aggressively rooting out false information on its platform.

Updated 31 mins ago - Politics & Policy

The latest: George Floyd protests nationwide

Police officers wearing riot gear push back demonstrators outside of the White House on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people continued for a seventh day across the U.S., with President Trump threatening on Monday to deploy the military if the unrest continues.

The latest: Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser criticized federal police in a tweet Monday night for using munitions earlier in the day "on peaceful protestors in front of the White House, an act that will make the job of (DC Police Department) officers more difficult." "Shameful!" she added as she urged residents to go home and stay safe.