Jul 20, 2017

"Deep divisions" in White House over Russia

Evan Vucci / AP

"Trump's embrace of Russia making top advisers wary," by AP's Vivian Salama: "Trump's persistent overtures toward Russia are placing him increasingly at odds with his national security and foreign policy advisers, who have long urged a more cautious approach."

  • "[A]n extended dinner conversation between Trump and ... Putin ... raised red flags with advisers already concerned by the president's tendency to shun protocol and press ahead with outreach toward Russia."
  • "Deep divisions are increasingly apparent within the administration on the best way to approach Moscow ...[S]ome top aides, including National Security Adviser Gen. H.R. McMaster, have been warning that Putin is not to be trusted."
  • Wow: "Foreign and U.S. officials said the Russians recommended that a note taker be present in the bare-bones official bilateral meeting. But Trump, who has repeatedly expressed concern over leaks, refused, instead relying on [SecState] Tillerson to document the meeting."

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