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Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

The attorneys general of Washington, D.C. and Maryland are suing President Trump for allegedly accepting payments and gifts from foreign governments while working in the White House, which they argue is in violation of the Constitution's emoluments clause, per the Washington Post.

Their case: They hone in on the fact that Trump kept ownership of the Trump Organization after he was inaugurated, and allege the president has "broken many promises to keep separate his public duties and private interests." Examples cited include his continuing to receive Trump Org financial reports as president (as his son Eric revealed); and stays by foreign leaders and diplomats at Trump hotels.

The A.G.s told the Post their suit largely focuses on the claim that many D.C. and Maryland-based venues are losing customers to Trump International Hotel near the White House. And if a judge takes up their case, they say one of their first actions will be to demand copies of Trump's tax returns and financial records to evaluate his foreign business dealings.

Flashback: This isn't the first lawsuit that has been brought against Trump for alleged conflicts of interest. Back in January, a non-governmental organization, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, filed a similar suit claiming Trump's involvement in the family company created unfair competition. And in March, D.C. restaurant Cork Wine Bar sued, claiming the restaurant at Trump Hotel had an unfair advantage as it is associated with the president.

Go deeper

Trump bump: NYT and WaPo digital subscriptions tripled since 2016

Data: Axios reporting and public filings; Chart: Axios Visuals

The New York Times and The Washington Post have very different strategies for building the subscription news company of the future.

The big picture: Sources tell Axios that the Post is nearing 3 million digital subscribers, a 50% year-over-year growth in subscriptions and more than 3x the number of digital-only subscribers it had in 2016. The New York Times now has more than 6 million digital-only subscribers, nearly 3x its number from 2016.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
1 hour ago - Energy & Environment

Biden's emerging climate orbit

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

As of Tuesday morning, we know a lot more about President-elect Joe Biden climate personnel orbit, even as picks for agencies like EPA and DOE are outstanding, so here are a few early conclusions.

Why it matters: They're the highest-level names yet announced who will have a role in what Biden is promising will be a far-reaching climate and energy agenda.

Janet Yellen is back

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Hannelore Foerster/Getty Images

A face familiar to Wall Street is back as a central player that this time will need to steer the country out of a deep economic crisis.

Driving the news: President-elect Joe Biden is preparing to nominate former Fed chair Janet Yellen to be Treasury secretary.

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