Illustration: Axios Visuals.

First, dating apps moved the experience of bumping into a good-looking stranger online. Now, the apps are coming for first dates.

Driving the news: The League, an exclusive dating platform that requires users to link to their LinkedIn accounts and wait for approval to join, is out with a new service called League Live. Those who sign up can go on three speed video chat dates within the app every week — it's yet another iconic step in courtship being relegated to smartphones.

The big picture, per Amanda Bradford, the founder of The League: The first date as we know it will soon be a thing of the past.

  • “In-person first dates will definitely be replaced by digital dates, as the stakes are lower and with video chatting you can figure out whether or not you click within the first few minutes,” she told Quartz.

Go deeper: Deep Dive: The future of dating

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Health

8 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week

Data: Compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

8 states set new highs last week for coronavirus infections recorded in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project (CTP) and state health departments. Montana, West Virginia, and Wyoming surpassed records from the previous week.

Why it matters: Cases and hospitalizations are rising in Michigan, a state that initially fought the pandemic with strict mitigation efforts, alongside states that took less action against the spread of the virus this spring.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump says if Biden's elected, "he'll listen to the scientists"Herd immunity claims by top Trump adviser are "pseudoscience," infectious-disease expert says.
  2. Map: 38 states, D.C. see surge in cases.
  3. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — Fauci says he's "absolutely not" surprised Trump got coronavirus.
  4. Business: Consumer confidence surveys show Americans are getting nervousHow China's economy bounced back from coronavirus.
  5. Sports: We've entered the era of limited fan attendance.
  6. Education: Why education technology can’t save remote learning.
Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
4 hours ago - Economy & Business

The Fed is starting to question its own policies

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Several officials at the Fed are beginning to worry about asset bubbles and excessive risk-taking as a result of their extraordinary policy interventions, James Politi writes for the Financial Times, citing interviews with multiple Fed presidents and members of the Board of Governors.

Details: Some are now pushing for "tougher financial regulation" as concerns grow that monetary policy is "encouraging behavior detrimental to economic recovery and creating pressure for additional bailouts."