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Photo: Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

More than two years after the Trump administration's attempt to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, the DACA case will finally come before the Supreme Court on Tuesday.

Driving the news: Trump’s move to end the program that protects hundreds of thousands of young, unauthorized immigrants from deportation was stymied by lower courts. The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments today over DACA and Trump's power to end it.

This case matters because however the Supreme Court rules will directly affect the lives of 700,000 young people who are at our colleges and universities, in our military, serving as teachers as nurses, as doctors, lawyers,” University of California president and former Department of Homeland Security secretary Janet Napolitano, who has led one of the lawsuits against Trump over DACA, told Axios.

  • “And they are a group that we should want to have in our country. Why should we want to kick them out?“

Two big questions: Did the Trump administration end DACA in a legally appropriate way? And do the courts have the authority to intervene at all?

What to watch: There are three potential outcomes, according to experts:

  1. The Supreme Court could agree with lower courts and reject Trump's rationale for ending DACA, forcing the White House to come up with a different reason or give up and let the program continue.
  2. It could say that, just as President Obama created DACA on his own, Trump can end it on his own.
  3. It could agree with the administration's argument that DACA is illegal, which would prevent a future administration from ever reviving it.

What they're saying: The challengers argue that the Trump administration violated the Administrative Procedure Act by ending DACA the way it did.

The other side: The Justice Department argues that just as Barack Obama used executive action to create DACA, the Trump administration also has the discretion to end it.

The bottom line: The Supreme Court's decision will determine whether hundreds of thousands of people who have grown up in and worked in the U.S. will be forced to return to where they were born. It could shape federal immigration law for years.

  • And it will bring the heated immigration debate to the forefront again as the 2020 general election season ramps up. A ruling is expected by late June.

Go deeper

Biden gets mixed grades on revolving door

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President Biden is getting mixed marks for his reliance on industry insiders to staff his administration during its first 100 days.

Why it matters: Progressives have leaned on the new president to limit the revolving door between industry and government. A new report from the Revolving Door Project praises him on that front but highlights key hires it deems ethically questionable.

Exclusive: Sen. Coons sees new era of bipartisanship on China

Sen. Chris Coons. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The Jan. 6 insurrection was a "shock to the system," propelling members of Congress toward the goal of shoring up America's ability to compete with China, Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.) told Axios during an interview Thursday.

Why it matters: Competition between China's authoritarian model and the West's liberal democratic one is likely to define the 21st century. A bipartisan response would help the U.S. present a united front.

By the numbers: States weighing voting changes

Data: Brennan Center for Justice at NYU Law; Cartogram: Michelle McGhee/Axios

Georgia is not alone in passing a law adding voting restrictions, but other states are seeing a surge in provisions and proposals that would expand access to the polls, according to data from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Driving the news: Just Wednesday, the New York State Assembly passed a bill to restore voting rights to convicted felons who have been released from prison.