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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said at a press conference Sunday that certain "low-risk" construction and manufacturing activities could begin in some regions when the state's stay-at-home order expires on May 15 as part of a "phase one" reopening.

The state of play: Cuomo said that phase one will only apply to regions that see total hospitalizations from the coronavirus decline for 14 days, which will likely be concentrated in upstate New York. He also noted that not all construction and manufacturing are the same and that businesses will be asked to develop safe procedures.

  • After a two-week period in which officials can monitor the effects of reopening, regions can then move on to "phase two."
  • Phase two will be guided by a "business-by-business analysis" that uses a matrix to determine how essential a business is and what risks would be posed by reopening, Cuomo said.

The big picture: New York reported 367 deaths over the past 24 hours, a steep decline that represents the first time the daily death toll has dropped below 400 this month. It continues a downward trend for the state's coronavirus outbreak, which is believed to have passed its peak.

Go deeper

Aug 2, 2020 - Health

Birx: U.S. has entered new phase of coronavirus pandemic

White House coronavirus task force coordinator Deborah Birx said Sunday on CNN that the U.S. has shifted into a new phase of the coronavirus pandemic, as infections have spread further into rural areas than in March and April.

Why it matters: Coronavirus infections in rural communities have surpassed the number of cases in big cities — and areas in the U.S. with fewer coronavirus testing sites were predominately rural as of May.

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

5 hours ago - Technology

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.