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Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The House and Senate on Wednesday voted down Sen. Ted Cruz's objection to Arizona in the Electoral College certification process.

Driving the news: More than a dozen senators said before Wednesday’s mob violence in the U.S. Capitol that they’d object, but only six ended up voting yes. The House vote was 303-121.

  • Sens. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), Tommy Tuberville (R-Ala.), Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Miss.), Roger Marshall (R-Kan.) and John Kennedy (R-La.) joined Cruz in objecting.
  • A majority of House Republicans voted to reject the electors.

The big picture: The House and Senate went into an extended recess on Wednesday after a "March for Trump" mob invaded the Capitol building, prompting mass evacuations of lawmakers, staff and members of the press.

  • Both chambers have now reconvened and are continuing the certification process.
  • States are certified in alphabetical order — with Arizona being the first battleground brought to the floor.

Go deeper

Scoop: Conservative group puts $700k behind Hawley

Sen. Josh Hawley explains his objection to certifying the 2020 election results hours after the U.S. Capitol siege. Photo: Congress.gov via Getty Images

A Republican group is raising and spending huge amounts of money defending Sen. Josh Hawley after he was ostracized for early January’s attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Why it matters: The Senate Conservatives Fund is plugging Hawley's ideological bona fides and backfilling lost corporate cash with needed political and financial support, helping inoculate him as he weighs reelection or a possible presidential campaign in 2024.

55 mins ago - Health

Treasury begins dispersing $350 billion in COVID relief funding to states and localities

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/UPI/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. Treasury on Monday began giving state and local governments access to $350 billion in emergency funding from the American Rescue Plan, the department announced Monday.

Why it matters: Though the money is aimed at helping state, local, territorial and tribal governments recover from the pandemic's economic fallout, the administration will generally give them wide latitude on how they can use the funds.

Game developers break silence around salaries

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Developers are sharing their salaries on Twitter under the hashtag #GameDevPaidMe to encourage pay transparency in their industry.

The big picture: The hashtag started circulating last year, but has returned periodically as developers fight for better working conditions. Salary sharing is a way to equalize the field. By removing the secrecy, as well as the stigma, around discussing pay, workers have more power to advocate for themselves when negotiating salaries and raises.