Feb 6, 2019

Craigslist founder puts another $15 million into journalism efforts

Photo: Eugene Gologursky/Getty Images for Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America

Craigslist founder Craig Newmark is investing $15 million into two separate efforts to boost efforts to strengthen journalism ethics for the digital age.

Why it matters: The media industry, once reliant on mostly advertising, has struggled to find a sustainable business model during the Internet age. Publishers have had to embrace new business models like events, sponsorships, and social publishing, but some of those efforts are harder to approach with full editorial independence.

By the numbers

$10 million will go towards launching the Craig Newmark Center for Journalism Ethics and Security and the Craig Newmark Professorship of Journalism at The Columbia Journalism School.

  • The Center will aim to advance and modernize journalistic ethics to account for modern realities of internet publishing, like the rise of propaganda and disinformation, per Steve Coll, dean of Columbia's Graduate School of Journalism.

$5 million will go towards creating the Craig Newmark Center for Ethics and Leadership at The Poynter Institute. This program will provide working journalists and industry leaders with relevant training and continued education.

  • The Center at Poynter will aim to strengthen ethical systems in newsrooms, says Kelly McBride, a media ethicist and Poynter's Vice President for Academic Programs.

The big picture: Newmark has already donated millions to causes to support journalism. He gave $20 million to the CUNY Journalism School last year and $20 million to fund The Markup, a non-profit investigative news startup.

"Right now, when our institutions are in some peril, regular people need to stand up for the country. The bottom line is that people like me have to go put our money where our mouth is."
— Craig Newmark to Axios

Go deeper

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8 p.m. ET: 857,487 — Total deaths: 42,107 — Total recoveries: 178,034.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in confirmed cases. Total confirmed cases as of 8 p.m. ET: 188,172 — Total deaths: 3,873 — Total recoveries: 7,024.
  3. Business updates: Should you pay your rent or mortgage during the coronavirus pandemic? Find out if you are protected under the CARES Act.
  4. Public health updates: More than 400 long-term care facilities across the U.S. report patients with coronavirus — Older adults and people with underlying health conditions are more at risk, new data shows.
  5. Federal government latest: President Trump said the next two weeks would be "very painful," with projections indicating the virus could kill 100,000–240,000 Americans.
  6. U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt: Captain of nuclear aircraft carrier docked in Guam pleaded with the U.S. Navy for more resources after more than 100 members of his crew tested positive.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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World coronavirus updates: UN warns of recession with "no parallel" to recent past

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

The novel coronavirus pandemic is the "greatest test" the world has faced together since the formation of the United Nations just after the Second World War ended in 1945, UN chief António Guterres said Tuesday.

The big picture: COVID-19 cases surged past 856,000 and the death toll exceeded 42,000 Tuesday, per Johns Hopkins data. Italy reported more than 12,000 deaths.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 55 mins ago - Health

White House projects 100,000 to 240,000 U.S. coronavirus deaths

President Trump said at a press briefing on Tuesday that the next two weeks in the U.S. will be "very painful" and that he wants "every American to be prepared for the days that lie ahead," before giving way to Deborah Birx to explain the models informing the White House's new guidance on the coronavirus.

Why it matters: It's a somber new tone from the president that comes after his medical advisers showed him data projecting that the virus could kill 100,000–240,000 Americans — even with strict social distancing guidelines in place.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 hours ago - Health