Reproduced from a KFF report; Chart: Axios Visuals

Only 14% of Americans think a coronavirus vaccine will be widely available before the November election, and even if it is, most Americans say they won't take it, according to a new poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Why it matters: It shows the huge level of skepticism surrounding the development of a vaccine at breakneck speed. When we eventually have a safe, effective vaccine, this skepticism could become a huge problem.

The big picture: 62% of adults say they're worried the Food and Drug Administration will rush to approve a vaccine under pressure from the Trump administration.

  • The responses vary predictably by partisan affiliation; 86% of Democrats and 61% of independents say they're worried, while only 35% of Republicans say the same.
  • Yes, but: Republicans were least likely to say they'd get a vaccine before the election, even if it was free and FDA-approved.

My thought bubble: A vaccine is what is supposed to get us out of this nightmare. But it's becoming clearer by the day that we'll have a whole new host of problems to solve once the first vaccine is authorized.

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Updated 35 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 30,393,591 — Total deaths: 950,344— Total recoveries: 20,679,272Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 6,722,699 — Total deaths: 198,484 — Total recoveries: 2,556,465 — Total tests: 92,163,649Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.
10 hours ago - Health

Rep. Khanna: COVID-19 could change the perception of public health care

Rep. Khanna and Axios' Margaret Talev

The universal experience of COVID-19 could change how opponents view Medicare for All, Rep. Ro Khanna (D-Calif.) said at an Axios virtual event on Friday.

What they're saying: "The pandemic has reminded us of our shared humanity with other American citizens. It's no longer possible to think, 'Oh, we're not part of those who get sick.' Now almost everyone knows, unfortunately, someone who has been hospitalized, someone who had a serious bout with COVID," Khanna said.

Rep. Brooks: We need to better prepare for pandemics

Axios' Margaret Talev (L) and Rep. Susan Brooks (R). Photo: Axios

Insufficient stockpiles and a lack of personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 pandemic should serve as a warning for America on future preparedness, Rep. Susan Brooks (R-Ind.) said at an Axios virtual event on Friday.

What they're saying: "Congress had been beefing up for years — the appropriations for preparedness — it certainly was not enough, and we recognize that," Brooks said.