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Reproduced from a KFF report; Chart: Axios Visuals

Only 14% of Americans think a coronavirus vaccine will be widely available before the November election, and even if it is, most Americans say they won't take it, according to a new poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Why it matters: It shows the huge level of skepticism surrounding the development of a vaccine at breakneck speed. When we eventually have a safe, effective vaccine, this skepticism could become a huge problem.

The big picture: 62% of adults say they're worried the Food and Drug Administration will rush to approve a vaccine under pressure from the Trump administration.

  • The responses vary predictably by partisan affiliation; 86% of Democrats and 61% of independents say they're worried, while only 35% of Republicans say the same.
  • Yes, but: Republicans were least likely to say they'd get a vaccine before the election, even if it was free and FDA-approved.

My thought bubble: A vaccine is what is supposed to get us out of this nightmare. But it's becoming clearer by the day that we'll have a whole new host of problems to solve once the first vaccine is authorized.

Go deeper

Dec 4, 2020 - World

UN: "2021 is literally going to be catastrophic"

David Beasley, executive director of the World Food Programme. Photo: Souleymane Ag Anara/AFP via Getty Images

Next year is "going to be catastrophic" in terms of worldwide humanitarian crises, World Food Program executive director David Beasley warned on Friday, per Reuters.

Driving the news: The stark outlook comes as many countries contend with not only the coronavirus pandemic, but also possible famine, economic instability, conflict and other humanitarian crises. A record 235 million people will need humanitarian assistance and protection next year, a nearly 40% increase from 2020, the UN projected earlier this week

Dec 4, 2020 - Health

CDC: It's time for "universal face mask use"

Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

The CDC is urging “universal face mask use” for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic began, citing recent case spikes as the U.S. has entered a phase of “high-level transmission” before winter officially begins.

Why it matters: Daily COVID-related deaths across the U.S. hit a new record on Wednesday. Face coverings have been shown to increase protection of the wearer and those around them, despite some Americans' reluctance to use them.

DeVos extends federal student loan relief to Jan. 31

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump administration is extending federal student loan relief, which includes a pause on payments and interest accrual, through Jan. 31, the Department of Education announced Friday.

Why it matters: Payments have been paused since March due to the coronavirus pandemic, but the relief was set to expire on Dec. 31 . The relief measures, which also include the suspension of collections of defaulted federal student loans, have helped mitigate some of the pandemic's negative consequences for millions of borrowers.