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Photo: Mark Makela via Getty Images

Black people in the city of Philadelphia, the nation's largest predominantly Black county, are lagging far behind white people when it comes to COVID-19 vaccinations, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: It's a reflection of larger racial disparities in vaccination rates across the United States. "Coronavirus immunizations are the latest iteration of the pandemic’s unequal burden," the Post writes.

By the numbers: Philadelphia has one of the higher vaccination rates among predominantly Black counties, according to the Post. But just 34% of Black people have received at least one dose, compared to 52% of white people.

  • Nationally, 54% of Americans have gotten at least one dose.
    • Of the population that has received at least one shot as of April 13, nearly two-thirds were white (65%), 11% were Hispanic, 9% were Black, 5% were Asian, 1% were American Indian or Alaska Native and less than 1% were Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, according to national CDC data reviewed by Kaiser.

What they're saying: "The health-care system has been largely untrustworthy to African Americans," Ala Stanford, a surgeon and founder of the Black Doctors COVID-19 Consortium, told the Post. "Which is different than saying African Americans don’t trust the health-care system."

  • People living in mostly Black neighborhoods in Philadelphia, which is one of the United State's most racially segregated and poorest cities, are also 28 times more likely to lack local access to a primary care physician compared to people in mostly non-Black neighborhoods.

Preventing socioeconomic disparities in the vaccination process was always going to be an uphill battle, but policy changes in response to the sluggish rollout have generally prioritized speed over equity, Axios' Caitlin Owens writes.

The big picture: States have looked to tackle vaccine equity in recent months, with new initiatives in Minnesota, Colorado and more.

Go deeper

The toll of environmental racism

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Geoff Robins/Getty Images

In August 2015, Steve Benally walked out of his Halchita, Utah, home on the Navajo Nation and heard a warning: Don't use the water. The Gold King Mine near Silverton, Colorado, had spilled toxic wastewater into the Animas River watershed.

The big picture: Benally would lose his harvest and suffer from secondary health effects, highlighting just one of the environmental dangers some Native Americans, Black Americans and Latinos face from pollution and poor government oversight.

Public health mapping key to saving lives in disasters

Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios

The increasing number of extreme weather incidents is spurring calls from emergency services workers and state and local officials for better public health mapping to identify and assist people at risk from environmental disasters.

Why it matters: People of color, especially Black Americans, have been disproportionately affected by environmental hazards and are more likely to die of environmental causes now and in the future.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Sep 18, 2021 - Energy & Environment

Climate change could hit people of color especially hard

Data: EPA; Note: Relative effects at 2°C warming above 1986-2005 average and 50 centimeters of sea level rise;  Chart: Sara Wise/Axios

A growing environmental threat to communities of color — particularly Black Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans — is the damage some are likely to suffer because of climate change in the coming years.

The big picture: This visual is based on an EPA analysis released this month that explores how warming and rising seas could make life especially miserable for people of color based on where they currently live in the lower 48 states.