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President Trump on Sept. 10. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

A three-judge federal court in New York on Thursday blocked the Trump administration's push to exclude undocumented immigrants from influencing congressional apportionment as determined by the 2020 Census.

Why it matters: Removing unauthorized immigrants from the census this year would cause California, Texas and Florida to lose at least one House seat they otherwise would have been awarded based on respective population increases, the Pew Research Center found this summer.

The big picture: Eight legal challenges emerged in response to Trump's executive memo to alter the census in July, per NPR.

  • There are less than three weeks to go before the U.S. Census ends. The count has been complicated by the coronavirus pandemic thwarting in-person events, door-knocking campaigns and other response strategies, Axios' Kim Hart reports.

What they're saying: “This is a huge victory for voting rights and for immigrants' rights," Dale Ho, director of the ACLU's Voting Rights Project, said in a statement. "President Trump has tried and failed yet again to weaponize the census against immigrant communities. The law is clear — every person counts in the census."

  • When signing the memo on the census, Trump claimed in a statement there "used to be a time when you could proudly declare, 'I am a citizen of the United States.' But now, the radical left is trying to erase the existence of this concept and conceal the number of illegal aliens in our country."

What's next: Thursday's ruling is likely to be appealed straight to the Supreme Court, NPR reports.

Go deeper

Why minority voter participation matters

Reproduced from the Pew Research Center; Chart: Axios Visuals

Legal barriers have contributed to limiting voter turnout among people of color. But if people of color voted at the rate of white voters, it would immediately alter who gets elected and what policies they pursue.

Why it matters: In the 2018 midterm elections, all major racial and ethnic groups saw a double-digit increase in their voter participation compared to the 2014 midterms, per the Pew Research Center.

Voter suppression then and now

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Barry Lewis/Getty Images 

From its start, the United States gave citizens the right to vote — as long as they were white men who owned property. From counting a slave as 3/5 of a white man to the creation of the Electoral College, there's a through-line of barriers that extends to today based on racial politics.

Why it matters: 150 years after the 15th Amendment — and 55 years after the passage of the Voting Rights Act — people of color still face systemic obstacles to voting.

Georgia governor declines Trump's request to help overturn election result

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp pushed back on Saturday after President Trump pressed him to help overturn the state's election results.

Driving the news: Trump asked the Republican governor over the phone Saturday to call a special legislative session aimed at overturning the presidential election results in Georgia, per the Washington Post. Kemp refused.