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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Voters are growing skeptical of a potential coronavirus vaccine, with the majority saying they would feel it was rushed without enough testing if one becomes available this year, according to a CBS News poll out Sunday.

By the numbers: About 21% of U.S. voters said they would get a vaccine as soon as possible if one became available at no cost, down from 32% in the same poll in July. 58% say they would consider it, but they'd wait to see what happens to others before getting one. 

  • 65% responded that if a vaccine were made available this year, their first thought would be that it was rushed through without enough testing — while 35% responded that it would be a medical achievement.

There was a partisan split in the responses, with 77% of Democrats saying they would think a vaccine available this year was rushed through, compared with 48% of Republicans.

  • 25% of Democrats said they would get a vaccine as soon as it was available, compared to 42% in July.
  • White Democrats are more than twice as likely as Black Democrats to say they would get a vaccine as soon as it was available. 

Why it matters: The question of whether politics influences the Trump administration's actions looms larger than ever, writes Axios' Caitlin Owens. Just as important is the question of whether we'll be ready for this complicated effort in less than two months.

The backdrop: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urged governors last week to do everything possible to get vaccine distribution sites operational by Nov. 1, McClatchy reports.

Methodology: The survey was conducted for CBS News by YouGov between Sept. 2–4. It is based on a representative sample of 2,493 registered voters and has a margin of error of ±2.4 points. 

Go deeper: Kamala Harris says she "would not trust" Trump on coronavirus vaccine

Go deeper

How the U.S. might distribute a coronavirus vaccine

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Now that there are glimmers of hope for a coronavirus vaccine, governments, NGOs and others are hashing out plans for how vaccines could be distributed once they are available — and deciding who will get them first.

Why it matters: Potential game-changer vaccines will be sought after by everyone from global powers to local providers. After securing supplies, part of America's plan is to tap into its military know-how to distribute those COVID-19 vaccines.

In photos: First coronavirus vaccines administered in the U.S.

The first doses of Pfizer's long-awaited coronavirus vaccine were distributed in the U.S. on Monday.

The state of play: Vaccines will first go to frontline health care workers followed by older and vulnerable populations. The distribution of Pfizer vaccine marks the beginning of a possible end of the coronavirus pandemic, and may soon be followed by a rollout of vaccines from Moderna and AstraZeneca.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.