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A trial COVID-19 vaccine. Photo: Silvio Avila/AFP via Getty Images

35% of Americans say they would refuse a coronavirus vaccine, even if it was free, approved by the Food and Drug Administration and available immediately, according to a Gallup poll released Friday.

The big picture: Health experts believe a vaccine — coupled with recommended public health measures — will be the path back to societal normalcy. But that outcome relies on a critical mass getting the vaccine so that the population can achieve herd immunity.

  • Many Americans, however, are split along party lines as to whether they'd be willing to obtain a vaccine for COVID-19.
  • 81% of Democrats said they would be willing to have a vaccine, while 47% of Republicans said the same.
  • Independents fell in the middle, with 59% reporting they would get vaccinated for the coronavirus.

By the numbers: Age and race are also strong predictors of a person's likelihood to be treated with a vaccine.

  • White Americans reported 67% willingness to get vaccinated, while non-white Americans reported a 59% likelihood.
  • 76% of 18-29-year-olds reported willingness to receive a vaccine, as well as 70% of those 65 and older.
  • But middle-aged Americans between 30-49 years old and 50-64-year-olds reported only 64% and 59% willingness, respectively.

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
Nov 17, 2020 - World

Rich countries are taking the vaccine fast lane. Others could wait years

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The vaccine breakthroughs from Pfizer and Moderna are incredible news, for a small sliver of the world.

The big picture: Wealthy countries like the U.S. have secured their access to those vaccines and others and are increasingly confident they'll begin mass vaccination this spring. But according to research from Duke University's Global Health Institute, there likely won't be enough doses to cover the entire global population until 2024.

Updated Dec 8, 2020 - Health

The states where face coverings are mandatory

Data: Compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Wyoming on Monday became the latest state to implement a mask mandate to fight COVID-19, amid a steep spike in cases across the country.

The big picture: States are reintroducing mitigation efforts like closing businesses and advising people to stay home as the U.S. averages the most daily cases of any point in the pandemic.

Updated 15 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director defends agency's response to pandemic — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Empire State Building among hundreds to light up in Biden inauguration coronavirus tribute.
  3. Vaccine: Fauci: 100 million doses in 100 days is "absolutely" doable.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode again.
  5. Tech: Kids' screen time sees a big increase.