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Data: Treasury Department via the Peter G. Peterson Foundation; Chart: Axios Visuals

The PPP initially made headlines for leaving out many small businesses who were muscled out by large corporations and savvier peers with long banking histories, but now even those who secured the funding say the program needs to be overhauled.

Driving the news: "It’s difficult to successfully use the Paycheck Protection Program loan," Jackie Victor, founder and owner of Detroit's Avalon Breads, writes in an op-ed for the New York Times.

  • She points out that requirements for the money to be spent within 60 days, that the business retains all its employees and that it uses 75% of the money for payroll makes practical use of the loan almost impossible.
  • Other business owners point out that for companies with workers who make less than they would through the government's expanded unemployment benefits, putting them back on payroll when they are not allowed to work is cruel and will actually hurt the relationship between employer and employee.

Details: The CARES Act increased eligibility for unemployment benefits, provided an additional $600 per week and extended insurance payments beyond the typical 26 weeks.

  • Since the enactment of those provisions in late March, federal spending on unemployment insurance has risen noticeably, the Peterson Foundation notes in a recent blog.

Go deeper: Unemployment is likely already at Great Depression-era highs

Go deeper

Updated Aug 9, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Republicans and Democrats react to Trump's coronavirus aid action

President Trump speaks to workers at a manufacturing facility in Clyde, Ohio, on Thursday. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Some Republicans joined Democrats in criticizing President Trump Saturday night for taking executive action on coronavirus aid, with Democratic leaders demanding the GOP return to negotiations after stimulus package talks broke down a day earlier.

Why it matters: Trump could face legal challenges on his ability to act without congressional approval, where the constitutional power lies on federal spending. Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) was the most vocal Republican critic, saying in a statement: "The pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop."

3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

McConnell drops filibuster demand, paving way for power-sharing deal

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (R) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell attend a joint session of Congress. Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has abandoned his demand that Democrats state, in writing, that they would not abandon the legislative filibuster.

Between the lines: McConnell was never going to agree to a 50-50 power sharing deal without putting up a fight over keeping the 60-vote threshold. But the minority leader ultimately caved after it became clear that delaying the organizing resolution was no longer feasible.

5 hours ago - Technology

Scoop: Google won't donate to members of Congress who voted against election results

Sen. Ted Cruz led the group of Republicans who opposed certifying the results. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Google will not make contributions from its political action committee this cycle to any member of Congress who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election, following the deadly Capitol riot.

Why it matters: Several major businesses paused or pulled political donations following the events of Jan. 6, when pro-Trump rioters, riled up by former President Trump, stormed the Capitol on the day it was to certify the election results.