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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Most people say they are more likely to believe their employers than government websites or traditional or social media when it comes to information about the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new Edelman Trust Barometer survey about the virus.

Why it matters: Absent consistent information from the government about the virus, and amid growing skepticism around fake news online, people are turning to business leaders for critical information.

Details: In most countries surveyed, including the U.S., people are more likely to believe that their employers are seen as better prepared than their countries to handle the outbreak, per the survey.

  • In the U.S., 51% of respondents say they trust that their employer is well-prepared, while 43% say that they trust that the country is.
  • Employers are expected to be a conduit of reliable information about the virus, including providing information about where to get tested and the latest statistics about the virus.
  • Most respondents globally say they prefer company-wide emails or newsletters as outreach, followed by posts to the company's internal website.

By the numbers: Most people (63%) say they are looking for daily updates from their employers about the virus.

  • In the United States, more than half (54%) say they are looking for daily updates, and nearly 20% say they are looking for updates several times per day.
  • The countries with some the worst outbreaks, like South Korea and Italy, have the highest percentage of people that say they want daily updates from their employers.

Be smart: Most people say they're likely to trust health care professionals and authorities — like doctors and hospitals and the World Health Organization (WHO) — to handle the virus effectively, followed by employers.

  • Most people globally (62%) and in the U.S. (69%) say they trust their employer to respond effectively and responsibly to the coronavirus outbreak.
  • A large majority of people globally (78%) and in the U.S. (75%) say businesses have a responsibility to ensure that their employees are protected from the virus in the workplace and that their employees do not spread the virus into the community.

Yes, but: When it comes to the most trusted spokespeople about the virus, most people say they trust health officials, such as scientists, doctors, and CDC and WHO officials over their employers.

The big picture: Diminishing trust in traditional societal leaders, like the government and traditional media, has generally forced people to turn to their employers more often for trusted information.

  • This ongoing dynamic has created a closer and more trusting employee-employer relationship over the past few years, but it has also placed more responsibility on CEOs and corporate leaders to communicate more effectively and efficiently with their employees.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 36 mins ago - World

Mexican President López Obrador tests positive for coronavirus

Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador during a press conference at National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico, on Wednesday. Photo: Ismael Rosas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador announced Sunday evening that he's tested positive for COVID-19.

Driving the news: López Obrador tweeted that he has mild symptoms and is receiving medical treatment. "As always, I am optimistic," he added. "We will all move forward."

52 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Sarah Huckabee Sanders to run for governor of Arkansas

Sarah Huckabee Sanders at FOX News' studios in New York City in 2019. Photo: Steven Ferdman/Getty Images

Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders will announce Monday that she's running for governor of Arkansas.

The big picture: Sanders was touted as a contender after it was announced she was leaving the Trump administration in June 2019. Then-President Trump tweeted he hoped she would run for governor, adding "she would be fantastic." Sanders is "seen as leader in the polls" in the Republican state, notes the Washington Post's Josh Dawsey, who first reported the news.

Coronavirus has inflamed global inequality

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

History will likely remember the pandemic as the "first time since records began that inequality rose in virtually every country on earth at the same time." That's the verdict from Oxfam's inequality report covering the year 2020 — a terrible year that hit the poorest, hardest across the planet.

Why it matters: The world's poorest were already in a race against time, facing down an existential risk in the form of global climate change. The coronavirus pandemic could set global poverty reduction back as much as a full decade, according to the World Bank.