A worker helps check in people at a coronavirus testing center in Los Angeles. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

As most of the world's wealthy countries resume normal life with their coronavirus outbreaks under control, the U.S. is facing the same catastrophic problems that defined its early experience.

Why it matters: The longer the pandemic rages on, the more human lives it costs and economic devastation it causes.

The state of play: Testing is a problem again. Some hard-hit cities are cutting back on who can be tested because of overwhelming demand, NYT reports. Supply shortages and laboratory backlogs are once again contributing to the problem.

  • Personal protective equipment is running low again, AP reports, which puts health care workers at risk of being infected by the virus.
  • Hospitalizations are spiking, once again raising the possibility that the health system could become overwhelmed.

The bottom line: The U.S. has built up its public health infrastructure since the spring, but not enough. And these measures, even when fully functional, aren't designed to counteract uncontrolled spread — which is what several states are experiencing.

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15 hours ago - Health

Nurses rally nationwide to demand protection amid pandemic

Healthcare workers on their way to work walk past demonstrators taking part in a national day of action in Miami on Wednesday. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Nurses took more than 200 active demonstrations inside and outside U.S. hospital facilities in at least 16 states and the District of Columbia on Wednesday to demand full personal protective equipment and federal government action.

Driving the news: National Nurses United (NNU) members are demanding that the Senate pass the HEROES Act, House Democrats' $3 trillion pandemic recovery package, which they said would protect health care workers by ensuring domestic production of PPE through the Defense Production Act.

18 hours ago - Health

Virginia launches contact tracing app using specs from Apple and Google

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Virginia's health department released a coronavirus contact tracing app on Wednesday that relies on a Bluetooth-based system designed by Apple and Google.

Why it matters: Adoption of COVID-19 tracing tech in the U.S. has been limited compared to other countries — and tracking who has possibly been exposed to the virus (and promptly notifying them) is crucial to stem the spread.

Updated 10 hours ago - Health

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios VisualsThe

The Philippines' economy sunk into recession as its gross domestic product shrank 16.5% in the second quarter — marking the lowest reading since 1981, official figures show.

The big picture: Millions of Filipinos went on lockdown Tuesday as cases surged past 106,300, with stay-at-home orders in place for two weeks in Manila and nearby provinces on the island of Luzon, per the BBC. The economy's contraction is the "deepest" on record, Bloomberg notes.