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Photo: U.S. Secret Service

The Secret Service provided a first look at the physical coronavirus stimulus checks bearing President Trump's name on Monday.

The state of play: The agency released the preview as part of a campaign, alongside the Treasury Department, to help Americans identify counterfeits. It cited Trump's name as a "genuine security feature," together with watermarks and microprinting.

What they're saying: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin told CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that it was his idea to put the president's name on the checks.

  • "He is the president, and I think it's a terrific symbol to the American public," Mnuchin said.
  • "I'm sure people will be very happy to get a big, fat, beautiful check, and my name is on it," Trump told a White House coronavirus briefing last week.

The big picture: A Treasury spokesperson told USA Today that including Trump's name would not delay delivery of the checks.

  • The Washington Post reported that senior IRS officials believed that adding the president's name may have slowed their printing.

Go deeper: New IRS website allows tracking of coronavirus stimulus payment

Go deeper

Updated Oct 7, 2020 - Health

World coronavirus updates

Expand chart
Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

New Zealand now has active no coronavirus cases in the community after the final six people linked to the Auckland cluster recovered, the country's Health Ministry confirmed in an email Wednesday.

The big picture: The country's second outbreak won't officially be declared closed until there have been "no new cases for two incubation periods," the ministry said. Auckland will join the rest of NZ in enjoying no domestic restrictions from late Wednesday, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said, declaring that NZ had "beat the virus again."

Jul 29, 2020 - Health

Cuomo plans to investigate overcrowding at Chainsmokers concert

Photo: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Safe & Sound

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced that the state health department will investigate "egregious social distancing violations" that took place at a concert last weekend in the Hamptons featuring The Chainsmokers, an electronic music duo.

The big picture: The concert came just a week after New York City reported zero coronavirus deaths. Cuomo told reporters Tuesday that public health violations can result in civil fines and possible criminal liability, AP notes.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
Jul 29, 2020 - Health

Reopening schools is a lose-lose dilemma for many families of color

Reproduced from KFF Health Tracking Poll; Note: Share includes responses for "very/somewhat worried", income is household income; Chart: Axios Visuals

Children of color have the most to lose if schools remain physically closed in the fall. Their families also have the most to lose if schools reopen.

Why it matters: The child care crisis created by the coronavirus pandemic is horrible for parents regardless of their race or income, but Black and Latino communities are bearing the heaviest burden.