Adapted from Brookings; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Black and Hispanic/Latino Americans have coronavirus mortality rates as much as 10x higher than white Americans' when age is taken into account, according to a new analysis by the Brookings Institution.

Why it matters: We've known that minorities are being hit harder by the coronavirus, but we didn't know it was this bad.

Between the lines: White Americans tend to be older than black and Latino Americans, putting a higher percentage of white people in older and thus more vulnerable age brackets. That's skewed the overall death rate by race.

  • When unadjusted for age, black people have a death rate twice that for whites, and Hispanics' death rate is about the same as whites'.
  • But when age is taken into account, the death rate for black Americans is 3.6 times that of white Americans, and Hispanics' is 2.5 times higher.

The bottom line: "Race gaps in vulnerability to Covid-19 highlight the accumulated, intersecting inequities facing Americans of color (but especially Black people) in jobs, housing, education, criminal justice – and in health," the authors write.

Go deeper: Why the coronavirus pandemic is hitting minorities harder

Go deeper

Jul 1, 2020 - Health

Coronavirus cases skyrocketing among communities of color

Adapted from Coders Against Covid using The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins and U.S. Census data; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Counties populated by larger numbers of people of color tend to have more coronavirus cases than those with higher shares of white people.

What we're watching: As the outbreak worsens throughout the South and the West, caseloads are growing fastest in counties with large communities of color.

Beyond nursing homes

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Nursing homes have been the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak, prompting more urgent discussions about alternative housing situations for elderly Americans.

Why it matters: Deaths in nursing homes and residential care facilities account for 45% of COVID-19 related deaths, per the Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity — but there are few other viable housing options for seniors.

The myth of closing the racial wealth gap through education

Adapted from the Cook Center on Social Equity; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

On average, Black households in the U.S. with heads who have completed a college degree have less net worth than white households headed by someone with less than a high school education.

Why it matters: It is only after completing advanced post-college work that the median Black household surpasses the median white household's net worth for a head with only a high school degree.