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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

In the fall, America's sports stadiums became voting centers and COVID-19 testing sites. Now, they're being used for another purpose: vaccine distribution.

The big picture: Thanks to their size, accessibility and sprawling parking lots, sports venues can handle large groups of people and long lines of cars, making them an ideal distribution partner for cities.

  • Houston: Nearly 4,000 people were vaccinated Saturday at Minute Maid Park (Astros).
  • Los Angeles: Dodger Stadium will provide shots to as many as 12,000 people per day this week.
  • New York: Citi Field (Mets) will become a 24/7 "mega" vaccination site by the end of the month, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Tuesday.
  • Boston: Gillette Stadium (Patriots) is the state's first mass vaccination site.
  • Phoenix: A parking lot outside State Farm Stadium (Cardinals) has been transformed into a 24/7 drive-thru vaccination site.
  • San Diego: A "super station" has been constructed at Petco Park (Padres), where the goal is to vaccinate 5,000 healthcare workers per day.
  • Miami: Hard Rock Stadium (Dolphins) has doubled as a vaccination hub, though it closed on Monday for the CFP National Championship.

Go deeper

15 hours ago - Health

CDC director: “I can’t tell you how much vaccine we have"

CDC director Rochelle Walensky, newly appointed by President Biden, told Fox News on Sunday that the administration does not know the current number of COVID vaccines available for distribution — due to a lack of data gathered by the agency under Trump — making it more difficult for states to accurately plan.

Why it matters: Hospitals in states including Texas, South Carolina, New York, and California have canceled thousands of appointments due to running low on vaccines or nearly depleting their share, the New York Times reports.

18 hours ago - Health

U.S. surpasses 25 million COVID cases

A mass COVID-19 vaccination site at Dodger Stadium on Jan. 22 in Los Angeles, California. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

The U.S has confirmed more than 25 million coronavirus cases, per Johns Hopkins data updated on Sunday.

The big picture: President Biden has said he expects the country's death toll to exceed 500,000 people by next month, as the rate of deaths due to the virus continues to escalate.