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Gov. Mike Parson. Photo: Jacob Moscovitch/Getty Images

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (R) and First Lady Teresa Parson tested positive for coronavirus, the governor's office announced Wednesday.

The big picture: The 65-year-old Parson is the second governor known to have contracted COVID-19, after Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt (R). Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) tested positive in August prior to meeting with President Trump, but it was later determined to be a false positive.

The state of play: The first lady was tested "after displaying minor symptoms," before Parson, who has not displayed symptoms, took a test of his own.

  • He continues to work "without interruption," according to the news release.
  • The governor's staff has been tested and is waiting for the results.

Worth noting: Parson has opposed a mask mandate in his state. He previously said "You don't need government to tell you to wear a dang mask."

Go deeper

Dec 31, 2020 - Health

WHO lists Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use

A healthcare worker giving a patient a dose of Pfizer-BioNTech's coronavirus vaccine in Florida on Dec. 30. Photo: Marco Bello/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The World Health Organization on Thursday listed Pfizer-BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use.

Why it matters: The approval — the WHO's first for a coronavirus vaccine — may allow some countries to expedite their own regulatory approval processes so they can import and administer the vaccine quicker, the WHO said.

Dec 31, 2020 - Health

U.S. set to end 2020 with just over 3 million vaccine doses administered

A healthcare worker hands Patrick Range, Sr., 88, a vaccination card after giving him the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami on Dec. 30. Photo: Marco Bello/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Americans received just over 3 million initial doses of coronavirus vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech in the 19 days following first shipments, according to a Bloomberg tally of government websites and CDC data.

Why it matters: It's far below Operation Warp Speed's goal of administering 20 million doses by the end of the year, raising concerns about how long it may be until enough people are vaccinated in the U.S. for life to return to normal.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
26 mins ago - Health

Where seniors remain vulnerable to the coronavirus

Expand chart
Data: CDC and Simon Willison; Note: The last reliable figure reported for New Hampshire was 83.9% on April 6, 2021; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

More than 80% of Americans 65 and older have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine, per the CDC, but millions across the country remain unvaccinated — particularly in the South.

Why it matters: Seniors who have yet to receive their shot remain highly vulnerable to the virus even as the country overall becomes safer.