Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

People line up to receive food and goods distributed by volunteers in Chelsea, Massachusetts on April 14, 2020. Chelsea has the second-highest Latino population in the state. Photo: Joseph Prezioso / AFP

The coronavirus is spreading at more than double the rate of the rest of the U.S. in counties that are at least a quarter Hispanic, a New York Times analysis out Friday indicates.

Why it matters: Many Latinos continued working as states shuttered businesses, keeping the economy running "at the cutting tables of food-processing plants, as farm hands, as hospital orderlies, food preparers, supermarket workers and in many other jobs deemed essential," The Times writes.

By the numbers: Counties across U.S. whose population is at least a quarter Latino have seen a 32% spike in new cases over the last two weeks, compared to a 15% increase for all other counties.

  • The analysis substantiates the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's tally indicating Latinos are disproportionately affected by the virus, making up 34% of cases nationwide, despite being 18% of the population.

Worth noting: There is no evidence that any ethnic or racial group is biologically more susceptible to the virus.

Zoom in: While the analysis showed strong disparities in infections in populous states like Texas and California, there were also differences in other parts of the country, the Times notes.

  • In North Carolina, Latinos make up 10% of the population, but 46% of infections.
  • In Wisconsin, Latinos constitute 7% of the population, but 33% of cases.
  • Yakima County, Washington, which had the state's worst outbreak, is about half Latino.
  • Santa Cruz County, Arizona, the center of the state's worst outbreak, is 84% Latino.

Go deeper: Coronavirus racial disparities are worse than we thought

Go deeper

Updated Nov 9, 2020 - Health

23 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week

Data: Compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

23 states set new highs last week for coronavirus infections recorded in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project (CTP) and state health departments. 15 states surpassed records from the previous week.

Why it matters: More states across the country are handling record-high caseloads than this summer.

Oct 2, 2020 - World

Australia and New Zealand to open "safe travel zone"

Australian Prime Minster Scott Morrison and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern in Sydney, Australia, in February. Photo: James D. Morgan/Getty Images

The prime ministers of Australia and New Zealand have agreed to "safe travel zone" plan that will be gradually rolled out, Australian Deputy PM Michael McCormack announced Friday.

Details: McCormack said the travel "bubble" will initially see Kiwis who aren't in a COVID-19 hot spot permitted to fly to New South Wales and the Northern Territory from Oct. 16 without mandatory quarantine. But NZ Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has made clear that Kiwis will have to go into quarantine upon their return.

Updated Oct 25, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Trumpworld coronavirus tracker

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

An outbreak of COVID-19 has struck the White House — including the president himself — just weeks before the 2020 election.

Why it matters: If the president can get infected, anyone can. And the scramble to figure out the scope of this outbreak is a high-profile, high-stakes microcosm of America's larger failures to contain the virus and to stand up a contact-tracing system that can respond to new cases before they have a chance to become outbreaks.