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Customers sit outside on the patio at Eight Row Flint in Houston, Texas, on May 22. Photo: Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Florida reported the most new coronavirus infections in one day on Friday, while Texas reached the same milestone on Thursday, according to state health department and Johns Hopkins data.

Why it matters: Both states have continued to ease lockdown restrictions despite the rising infection rates. Florida entered its second phase of reopening last Friday, and Texas is well into its third phase, as both states allow most or all businesses to admit half as many people as they typically would.

What's happening: Florida reported a significantly higher number of new coronavirus deaths on Friday — 29 in total — after daily fatalities declined for the previous week. The daily death count in Texas has largely plateaued, albeit with frequent spikes.

  • Texas has seen over 82,000 cases and more than 1,900 deaths as of Friday, while Florida counts over 70,000 infections and more than 2,800 fatalities.
In Texas:
  • Transmission in Houston — the epicenter of the virus for the state — is uncontrolled and poses a significant threat to the community, Harris County Judge Lina Hidalgo said at a Thursday press conference.
  • "We don't have evidence that the public health measures we have in place are able to limit that community transmission," Hidalgo added.
  • Houston's mayor called for residents to "flatten the curve again," as Hidalgo advised people to social distance, wear face coverings and avoid crowds.
  • The average age of those being hospitalized for the virus in Houston is decreasing, David Persse, public health authority for Houston, told reporters on Thursday. He partially attributed the trend to increased testing in nursing homes and young people choosing not to social distance or wear masks.
In Florida:
  • Over 1,000 new infections have been reported every day since last Tuesday. At least 11,700 people have been hospitalized across the state, with 135 more reported on Friday, per the Miami Herald.
  • Florida saw a 65% increase in the number of coronavirus tests performed this week alongside a 65% increase in cases, Axios' Andrew Witherspoon and Sam Baker report.
  • "I think it's important for people to understand who is being tested now, compared to who was being tested in March and early April when we had our peaks then," Gov. Ron DeSantis told reporters on Friday, when asked about rising cases. "Back then, you needed to have symptoms, and you really, unless you got a doctor's note, in our tests sites, cause of CDC's guidance, you're looking at age 65 and above."
  • President Trump's acceptance speech as the 2020 Republican presidential nominee will be held in Jacksonville, Florida. That county has reported a much higher concentration of COVID-19 infections than the rest of north Florida.

The big picture: Infections are also rising in California, North Carolina, Arizona, Tennessee, Louisiana and Washington state, per a New York Times analysis.

What to watch: "If cases begin to go up again, particularly if they go up dramatically, it's important to recognize that more mitigation efforts such as what were implemented back in March may be needed again," Jay Butler, CDC’s deputy director of infectious diseases and COVID-19 response incident, said Friday.

Go deeper: Coronavirus curve rises in Florida

Go deeper

Updated Oct 25, 2020 - Health

13 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week

Data: Compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

13 states set new highs last week for coronavirus infections recorded in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project (CTP) and state health departments. Kansas, Montana, North Dakota and Wyoming surpassed records from the previous week.

The big picture: The pandemic is getting worse again across the country, and daily coronavirus cases have risen in the U.S. for six straight weeks, according to a seven-day average tracked by Axios. The U.S. reported over 80,000 new cases on both Friday and Saturday.

Updated 1 min ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Large coronavirus outbreaks leading to high death rates — Coronavirus cases are at an all-time high ahead of Election Day — Fauci says U.S. may not return to normal until 2022
  2. Politics: Top HHS spokesperson pitched coronavirus ad campaign as "helping the president" — Space Force's No. 2 general tests positive for coronavirus
  3. World: Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local coronavirus cases — Europe faces "stronger and deadlier" wave France imposes lockdown Germany to close bars and restaurants for a month.
  4. Sports: Boston Marathon delayed MLB to investigate Dodgers player who joined celebration after positive COVID test.
Sep 20, 2020 - Health

Trump's health secretary asserts control over all new rules

HHS Secretary Alex Azar and President Donald Trump. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar wrote a memo this week giving him authority over all new rules and banning any of the health agencies, including the FDA, from signing any new rules "regarding the nation’s foods, medicines, medical devices and other products," the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: The story further underscores reporting that health and scientific agencies are undergoing a deep politicization as the Trump administration races to develop a coronavirus vaccine, as Axios' Caitlin Owens has reported. Peter Lurie, a former associate commissioner of the FDA, told the Times that the Azar memo amounted to a "power grab."