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Angel Medrano, 8, and a friend at an RV park on Oct. 7 in Phoenix, Arizona. The Medrano family had narrowly avoided eviction earlier in the day. Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

Landlords are sidestepping the CDC's order to halt evictions by ousting tenants for minor violations instead of rent nonpayment, housing advocates tell AP.

The big picture: Protections from the CDC's order — which applies to people who are unable to pay rent or are likely to become homeless if evicted — expire on Dec. 31, with no sign from Congress that an extension is coming.

  • To get assistance under the CDC order, renters must also show that they tried to obtain all government aid currently available and that they are unable to make payments due to loss of income, a layoff or extraordinary out-of-pocket medical expenses.

Between the lines: Landlords have been able to begin eviction proceedings in court during the CDC's moratorium, which means early January could bring a wave of evictions, Shamus Roller, executive director of the National Housing Law Project, told USA Today.

Details: Landlords have evicted tenants for minor violations on lease agreements including excessive trash or noise, or not extending their leases, per AP.

  • Dana Imus, a 41-year-old mother living in Fremont, Nebraska, was given notice to vacate after she fell behind on rent — before a judge ruled that she qualified for the CDC's protections.

Go deeper

Dec 1, 2020 - Health

CDC panel: COVID vaccines should go to health workers, long-term care residents first

Hospital staff work in the COVID-19 intensive care unit in Houston. Photo: Go Nakamura via Getty

Health-care workers and nursing home residents should be at the front of the line to get coronavirus vaccines in the United States once they’re cleared and available for public use, an independent CDC panel recommended in a 13-1 emergency vote on Tuesday, per CNBC.

Why it matters: Recent developments in COVID-19 vaccines have accelerated the timeline for distribution as vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna undergo the federal approval process. States are preparing to begin distributing as soon as two weeks from now.

Updated 6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.