Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The U.S. is doing almost as much testing as experts had predicted we'd need, and it's still far from enough given our enormous caseload — which the experts hadn't accounted for.

Driving the news: "In light of the ongoing spread of COVID-19 in states across the country, many labs are now receiving more test orders than they are able to process in a single day. We have urged ordering providers to prioritize testing for those most in need, especially hospitalized and symptomatic patients," Julie Khani, president of the American Clinical Laboratory Association, said in a statement Tuesday

The bottom line: That means we're nearly back to where we started in March, when tests were limited to the sickest patients.

  • The point of building up testing capacity wasn't so that we could keep track of how many times states set new caseload records. It was so that we'd have information about the spread of the virus, and then act accordingly to stop it.
  • As cases began to rise last month, we failed to act accordingly.

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Oct 21, 2020 - World

Spain becomes first nation in Western Europe to exceed 1 million COVID-19 cases

Photo: Miquel Benitez/Getty Images

Spain exceeded 1 million confirmed coronavirus cases on Wednesday, becoming the first country in Western Europe to hit the milestone, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

The state of play: Spain, which reported 16,973 cases over the previous 24 hours, was one of the most affected countries when the pandemic started, and cases have been on the rise since September, according to NPR.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Chris Christie: Wear a mask "or you may regret it — as I did" — Senate Democrats block vote on McConnell's targeted relief bill.
  2. Business: New state unemployment filings fall.
  3. Economy: Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet).
  4. Health: FDA approves Gilead's remdesivir as a coronavirus treatment How the pandemic might endMany U.S. deaths were avoidable.
  5. Education: Boston and Chicago send students back home for online learning.
  6. World: Spain and France exceed 1 million cases.
Bryan Walsh, author of Future
Oct 21, 2020 - Science

Biology is having its industrial revolution

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Bioscience research is undergoing a wave of automation and digitization, turning a manual, laborious practice into a true industry.

Why it matters: Biotechnology promises to revolutionize everything from medicine to energy, but for that to happen, the field needs to move out of the traditional lab and into something resembling a foundry. The growth of robotics and cloud-based remote research can help make that happen.