Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise, Naema Ahmed/Axios

Texas, Arizona and Oregon saw significant spikes last week in new coronavirus infections, while cases also continued to climb in a handful of states where steady increases have become the norm.

Why it matters: Nationwide, new cases have plateaued over the past week. To get through this crisis and safely continue getting back out into the world, we need them to go down — a lot.

Between the lines: Improved testing can cause the number of confirmed cases in a particular state to rise, even if that state's outbreak isn't getting that much worse.

  • At least in Texas, however, the spike in recorded cases does seem to reflect an actual increase in new infections — not just better testing.
  • Testing in Texas increased by 36% over the past week, while the number of confirmed infections rose by 51%.
  • Texas also saw an increase in the percentage of all coronavirus tests that came back positive. In a state where testing is improving and the underlying outbreak isn't getting worse, you'd expect the share of positive tests to go down.

The big picture: Axios is tracking each state's caseload week by week, using a seven-day average. The disparities between states, and these sudden spikes in places that had been making progress, underline just how tentative the U.S.' progress against the virus has been.

Go deeper

Jul 7, 2020 - Health

Texas reports more than 10,000 coronavirus cases

A person receiving a coronavirus test on July 7 in Austin, Texas. Photo: Sergio Flores/Getty Images

Texas reported a record 10,028 coronavirus cases on Tuesday, according to Texas Health and Human Services.

Why it matters: This is the first time the state reported more than 10,000 new cases in a single day since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Robert Mueller speaks out on Roger Stone commutation

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller testifies before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on Capitol Hill on Wednesday July 24, 2019. Photo: The Washington Post / Contributor

Former special counsel Robert Mueller responded to claims from President Trump and his allies that Roger Stone was a "victim" in the Justice Department's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, writing in a Washington Post op-ed published Saturday: "He remains a convicted felon, and rightly so."

Why it matters: The rare public comments by Mueller come on the heels of President Trump's move to commute the sentence of his longtime associate, who was sentenced in February to 40 months in prison for crimes stemming from the Russia investigation. The controversial decision brought an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars.

Trump dons face mask during Walter Reed visit

Trump wearing a face mask in Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on July 11. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump wore a face mask during his Saturday visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, according to AP.

Why it matters: This is the first known occasion the president has appeared publicly with a facial covering as recommended by health officials since the coronavirus pandemic began, AP writes.