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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The coronavirus pandemic is bringing out Silicon Valley's penchant for problem solving.

The big picture: Tech companies, entrepreneurs, and investors have rushed to find ways to apply their skills, resources, and creativity to tackling the virus and its public health and economic impact.

A number of health care startups, including Everlywell, Carbon Health and Nurx, shifted quickly to working on developing COVID-19 testing kits.

  • A ban by the FDA on the collection of at-home samples halted some of these efforts.
  • Telehealth startups like Ro and American Well are also providing assessment services that attempt to aid patients figure out their likelihood of infection.

Other companies are tapping into their existing supply chains and expertise.

Many software companies decided to offer some products for free to those coping with the crisis.

  • They include messaging service Slack, meditation app Headspace and business information provider Yext.

Investors jumped into action as well.

Tech giants also moved swiftly to finish projects and build solutions.

  • Companies like Apple and Google set out to procure supplies and stood up websites providing information and guidance to the public.
  • Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter and other companies sponsored a coronavirus-focused hackathon.
  • Facebook quickly rolled out information about the coronavirus to its users and banned ads for face masks and cures, while Twitter issued strict rules about spreading misinformation about the pandemic.
  • California Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday that Facebook will help pay for housing, child care, transportation and other costs incurred by retired health care professionals who agree to work during the pandemic.

Yes, but: Some tech leaders have also been criticized for their armchair epidemiology on Twitter.

The bottom line: Most Silicon Valley leaders and workers understand that the key fight right now belongs to medical science and healthcare professionals, but they're eager to pitch in — and have plenty of both ideas and resources.

Go deeper

Texas AG sues Biden administration over deportation freeze

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks to members of the media in 2016. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is suing the Biden administration in federal district court over its 100-day freeze on deporting unauthorized immigrants, and he's asking for a temporary restraining order.

Between the lines: The freeze went into effect Friday, temporarily halting most immigration enforcement in the U.S. In the lawsuit, Paxton claims the move "violates the U.S. Constitution, federal immigration and administrative law, and a contractual agreement between Texas" and the Department of Homeland Security.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 hour ago - Podcasts

Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck

President Biden has said that getting Americans vaccinated for COVID-19 is his administration’s top priority given an initial rollout plagued by organizational, logistical and technical glitches.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the bottlenecks and how to unclog them with Carbon Health chief executive Eren Bali, whose company recently began helping to manage vaccinations in Los Angeles.